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Monday, Aug 04, 2014
The Alaska Volcano Observatory set the volcano back to normal status a few days ago, as no more signs of eruptive activity had been detected recently. [more]
Tuesday, Jul 01, 2014
"Weak thermal signals from recent lava flows persist in satellite images. Small, discrete seismic events continue, however, and eruptive activity could resume at any time with little or no warning." (AVO) [more]
Map of Pavlov volcano and the Emmons Lake volcanic center on the Alaksa Peninsula. (Image Creator: Waythomas, Chris /Image courtesy of AVO/USGS)
Map of Pavlov volcano and the Emmons Lake volcanic center on the Alaksa Peninsula. (Image Creator: Waythomas, Chris /Image courtesy of AVO/USGS)

Pavlof volcano

Stratovolcano 2519 m / 8,264 ft
Alaska Peninsula, USA, 55.42°N / -161.89°W
Current status: dormant (1 out of 5)
Pavlof webcams / live data
Last update: 4 Aug 2014 (currently dormant)
Typical eruption style: Explosive.
Pavlof volcano eruptions: 1762(?), 1790(?), 1817, 1825(?), 1838(?), 1844, 1846, 1852(?), 1866(?), 1880, 1886, 1892, 1894, 1901, 1903(?), 1906, 1914, 1917, 1922, 1924, 1929, 1936, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1958, 1960, 1966, 1973, 1974(?), 1975, 1980(Mar-May), 1980 (Jul)(?), 1980 (Nov), 1981, 1983 (Jul), 1983 (Nov-Dec), 1983, 1986, 1990, 1996, 2007 (Aug), 2013, 2014 No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Pavlov is the most active volcano of the Aleutian arc.

Background:

The 2519-m-high, largely snow-capped Holocene stratovolcano was constructed along a line of vents extending NE from the Emmons Lake caldera.
Pavlof and its twin volcano to the NE, 2142-m-high Pavlof Sister, form a dramatic pair of symmetrical, glacier-covered stratovolcanoes that tower above Pavlof and Volcano bays. A third cone, Little Pavolf, is a smaller volcano on the SW flank of Pavlof volcano, near the rim of Emmons Lake caldera. Unlike Pavlof Sister, Pavlof has been frequently active in historical time, typically producing strombolian to vulcanian explosive eruptions from the summit vents and occasional lava flows. The active vents lie near the summit on the north and east sides. The largest historical eruption of Pavlof took place in 1911, at the end of a 5-year-long eruptive episode; a fissure opened on the northern flank of the volcano, ejecting large blocks and issuing lava flows.
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Source: GVP (Global Volcanism Program), Pavlov information


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