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Portugal (Place)

Prestahnukur volcano (Volcano)

Prevo Peak (Volcano)

Prevo Peak is a beautiful symmetrical stratovolcano resembling Mt. Fuji in Japan. FOr this reason, it is often called Simushiru-Fuji. The volcano has a 450 x 600 m wide summit crater with a nested inner cone rising to almost the same height as parts of the outer rim. The inner cone itself has a deep, 350-m-wide crater with a small lake on its floor. There are young-looking lava flows that have reached both coasts of central Simushir Island. The youngest of these flows are probably those on the south (Pacific side). 2 small cinder cones on the western flank have produced lava flows that reached or nearly reached the Sea of Okhotsk. 2 eruptions are known from Prevo Peak volcano in historic times. The largest was around 1765 and generated pyroclastic flows that killed all vegetation at the base of the volcano. The second eruption around 1825 consisted in weak ash emissions. (Source: GVP Smithsonian volcano information)

Pu'u 'O'o (Vulkan)

Puchuldiza (Volcano)

Puchuldiza is a geothermal field west of Salar Coipasa in northern Chile. It is surrounded by older volcanoes. No Holocene eruptive activity has occurred at Puchuldiza, but there are hot pools with water up to 85 deg C, steam vents and geysers, suggesting that there might still be an active magma chamber.

Puesto Cortaderas (Volcano)

The Puesto Cortaderas formation in Argentina is an isolated basaltic cinder cone SE of the Sierra Huantraico range, NE of Puesta Cortaderas, and is believed to be younger than 10,000 years old.

Pular (Volcano)

Pular is a stratovolcano in the Antofagasta Region of northern Chile, NW of the Salar de Pular and 15 km from the border with Argentina. The volcano belongs to a 12-km long chain of several vents and volcanoes, which have erupted extensive lava flows. A large satellite vent west of the ridge is known as Cerro Pajonales and is probably the youngest vent of the volcanic complex. Reports of a small explosive eruption in 1990 could not be confirmed as to where it occurred. -> See whole entry

Pulosari (Volcano)

Pulosari volcano is an eroded stratovolcano at the west coast of Java and located south of the 15-km-wide Danau caldera. Its summit contains a nearly 300-m-deep crater with active solfataras on its wall. Pulosari volcano is basaltic-to-andesitic in composition and separated from younger and higher Karang volcano by a low saddle.

Pululagua (Volcano)

Pululagua volcano is a low forested stratovolcano cut by a caldera. It is located immediately north of the equator, 15 km north of the capital Quito. The caldera is 5 km wide and irregularly shaped and covers an area of 19 km2. The caldera formed about 2450 year ago after a series of violent explosive eruptions. It is partially filled by post-caldera dacite lava domes, which rise to up to 480 m above the caldera floor, and is breached to the west along the Rio Blanco valley. There are several older lava domes on the eastern, SE and southern flank of the volcano as well. There is no historic activity, but radiocarbon-dated tephra layers witness frequent explosive eruptions in the past thousands of years. The latest known eruption occurred from vents near the lava domes in the caldera about 1670 years ago. It produced lava flows and pyroclastic flows. -> See whole entry

Pumice (Volcanology: pumice stone)

Pumice is a very light, porous volcanic rock that forms during explosive eruptions. During the eruption, volcanic gases dissolved in the liquid portion of verz viscous magma expand very rapidly to create a foam or froth; the liquid part of the froth then quickly solidifies to glass around the gas bubbles. The volume of gas bubbles is usually so large that pumice is lighter than water and floats. Pumice is an important industrial mineral used to produce high-quality cement and lightweight, isolating building materials. -> See whole entry

Punta Pulpito (Volcano)

Punta Púlpito volcano is a lava dome which formed about 500,000 years ago on a small peninsula at the Gulf of California east of the southern tip of Bahía Concepción. It is included in the catalogue of potentially active volcanoes because it still has an active geothermal system with hot springs and steaming ground. One active geothermal field is known as the Saquicismunde geothermal area, and the larger Los Volcanes geothermal area, located along the coast about 5 km south of Punta el Púlpito, contains 18 fumaroles along a NW-SE alignment.

Puntiagudo-Cordón Cenizos (Volcano)

Puntiagudo-Cordón Cenizos volcano is a volcanic chain located between Lago Rupanco and Lago Todos Los Santos in the Chilean lake district in central Chile. Volcán Puntiagudo is an andesitic stratovolcano with a prominent 2493-m-high sharp-peaked summit (hence its name), which was shaped by glacial dissection. -> See whole entry

Puracé (Volcano)

Puracé volcano in SW Colombia, 25 km SE of Popayan, is one of the most active volcanoes in Colombia with frequent explosive eruptions. Its largest historic eruptions occurred in 1849, 1869, and 1885. The last eruption of Puracé volcano was a small (VEI 2) eruption in 1977. It deposited ash up to 7 km away. In 1990 new fumaroles and hot springs were observed at the summit and on the flank. -> See whole entry

Purico (Volcano)

Purico volcano is a volcanic complex in northern Chile, 13 km south of the Bolivian border. The complex consists of 2 large 1.3 million years old ignimbrite sheets, several older stratovolcanoes and domes including Cerro Toco lava dome, and the younger, less than 10,000 years old lava domes Cerro Chascón de Purico and Cerro Aspero, and the dacitic Macon stratovolcano at the southern end. A maar, Alitar maar, is located at the SE end and shows constant solfatara activity. A sulfur mine on the SE flank of Cerro Toco was mined until the early 1990s. The volcanic complex is the site of numerous astronomical instruments including the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, Atacama Pathfinder Experiment, Atacama Cosmology Telescope, Atacama Submillimeter Telescope, and NANTEN2 Observatory. -> See whole entry

Putana (Volcano)

Volcán Putana (also known as Jorgencal or Machuca) is a stratovolcano in northern Chile on the border with Bolivia. Strong fumarolic activity is present at the summit crater and is visible from far distance, and the volcano has large sulfur deposits. The volcano, whose name literally means "whore" has (probably) erupted twice in historic times. Its name might allure to a major destructive eruption reported in the 19th century, although some recent research suggests that there actually were eruptions at all in historic times at Putana volcano. -> See whole entry

Puyehue-Cordón Caulle (Volcano)

Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano in Central Chile is a complex of 2 volcanoes: Puyehue volcano and the fissure system of Cordón Caulle. Puyehue volcano has a 2.4 km wide summit caldera, but historical eruptions occurred at the Cordón Caulle rift zone. The Cordón Caulle geothermal area occupies a 6 x 13 km wide depression and is the largest active geothermal area in the southern Andes. Neighboring Calbuco and Puyehue volcanoes lie on the same traverse fault and is has been noted that they tend at the same time or within only few years distance. -> See whole entry

Puyuhuapi (Volcano)

Puyuhuapi volcano is a chain of basaltic cinder cones in southern Chile, at the head of Puyuhuapi fjord. The cones were formed on 2 NE-SW trending eruptive fissures. -> See whole entry

pyroclastic flow (Volcanology)

Fluid avalanche of turbulently mixed ash, lava and or rock fragments, and air, that flows down the flanks of a volcano, driven by gravity. Pyroclastic flows are usually very hot and highly destructive. -> See whole entry

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