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Seismic activity at Shishaldin volcano today (SSLW station / AVO)
Friday, Jan 23, 2015
The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) reported "strongly elevated" temperatures in the summit crater on satellite data from yesterday. This could indicate lava is present there, possibly strombolian activity. What seems to be light ash fall deposits on the upper snowy flanks was visible on webcam images. ... [more]
Monday, Jan 12, 2015
Seismicity at the volcano remains slightly elevated, but no signs of significant activity have been noted recently, only some steam emissions were observed occasionally. AVO maintains Aviation Color Code "Orange" and Volcano Alert Level "Watch". [more]

Shishaldin volcano

Stratovolcano 2857 m / 9,373 ft
United States, Aleutian Islands, 54.76°N / -163.97°W
Current status: minor activity or eruption warning (3 out of 5)
Shishaldin webcams / live data
Last update: 23 Jan 2015
Typical eruption style: explosive
Shishaldin volcano eruptions: 2014, 2008 (?), 2004, 2002, 2000, 1999, 1997, 1995, 1993, 1986-87, 1981 (?), 1979, 1978, 1976, 1975, 1967, 1963, 1955, 1953, 1951, 1948, 1946-47, 1932, 1929, 1928, 1927, 1925, 1922, 1912 (?), 1901, 1899 (?), 1898, 1897 (?), 1883, 1880-81, 1865 (?), 1842, 1838, 1830, 1927-29, 1826, 1825, 1824, 1790 (?), 1775-78 No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation

Background:

The beautifully symmetrical volcano of Shishaldin is the highest and one of the most active volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands. The 2857-m-high, glacier-covered volcano is the westernmost of three large stratovolcanoes along an E-W line in the eastern half of Unimak Island. The Aleuts named the volcano Sisquk, meaning "mountain which points the way when I am lost." A steady steam plume rises from its small summit crater. Constructed atop an older glacially dissected volcano, Shishaldin is Holocene in age and largely basaltic in composition. Remnants of an older ancestral volcano are exposed on the west and NE sides at 1500-1800 m elevation. Shishaldin contains over two dozen pyroclastic cones on its NW flank, which is blanketed by massive aa lava flows. Frequent explosive activity, primarily consisting of strombolian ash eruptions from the small summit crater, but sometimes producing lava flows, has been recorded since the 18th century.
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Smithsonian / GVP volcano information

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