Aoga-shima

Schichtvulkan 423 m / 1,388 ft
Izu Islands (Japan), 32.45°N / 139.76°E
Aktueller Status: normal / ruhend (1 von 5)
Last update: 11 Mär 2022

Aoga-shima volcano (青ヶ島, Aogashima) is a stratovolcano forming a beautiful small 2.5 x 3.5 km island with steep cliffs in the Izu island chain, 300 km south of Tokyo.
The dominantly basaltic Aoga-shima volcano contains a complex caldera (Ikenosawa Crater) with a diameter of 1.7 x 1.5 km. 2 cones were built inside the caldera during the volcano's last eruptions in 1781-85.
Activity of Aogashima volcano includes pyroclastic flows and lava flows from both summit and flank vents.

Interaktive Karte zeigen
Typische Tätigkeit: explosive
Ausbrüche: 1781-85, 1670-80, 1652, 600 BC ± 200 years, 1100 BC ± 300 years, 1200 BC ± 50 years, 1800 BC ± 100 years
Letzte Erdbeben in der Nähe: Keine jüngeren Beben

Beschreibung

The oldest part of Aoga-shima volcano was the Kurosaki stratovolcano in the NW part of the island. The present-day stratovolcano grew later in the SE part of the island. A 1-1.5 km wide crater or caldera formed on the SE flank of the main cone.
About 3000 years ago a powerful explosive eruption produced pyroclastic surges that swept over the entire island, and during the activity in the following 600 years, most of the crater on the SE side was filled by lava flows and scoria deposits. Renewed collapse and possibly a debris avalanche re-formed the caldera and created the present-day Ikenosawa Crater, which also was the site of the historic activity.
(Source: Smithsonian / GVP volcano information)

1781-85 eruption (Tenmei eruption)
Following a year of increased hydrothermal activity since 1780, earthquakes and small ash eruptions occurred on 3 and 4 May 1781. On 10 and 11 April 1783, a strong strombolian-lava fountain eruption started and built a new scoria cone inside the crater. 61 houses were burned and there were 7 fatalities.
Similarly, on 18 April 1785, strong strombolian eruptions resumed and built a second cone in the crater. The eruption caused 130-140 fatalities (although details are not known), while 163 residents escaped to Hachijo-jima Island. The eruption also produced lava flows inside Ikenosawa Crater.
From historic documents, it seems that by 1787 the eruption had ended.
---
Source:
Takada et al (1992) "Geology of Aogashima Volcano, Izu Islands, Japan", Bulletin of the Volcanological Society of Japan 37(5), pp. 233-250

Siehe auch: Sentinel hub | Landsat 8 | NASA FIRMS
App herunterladen
Volcanoes & Earthquakes - new app for Android
Android | iOS-Version

Mehr auf VolcanoDiscovery

Warum gibt es Werbung auf dieser Seite?
Unterstützen Sie unsere Arbeit!
Diese Webseite und die dazugehörigen Apps und Tools instandzuhalten und kostenlos Nachrichten zu Vulkanen, Erdbeben und anderen Themen bereitzustellen, verschlingt enorm viel Zeit und auch Geld.
Wenn Sie die Infos mögen und uns in der Arbeit dazu unterstützen wollen, würden wir uns über eine Spende (über PayPal oder mit Kreditkarte) sehr freuen.
Online Zahlung (Kreditkarte)
Damit können wir Ihnen auch in Zukunft neue Features entwickeln und Bestehende laufend verbessern.Vielen Dank!
Sources: VolcanoDiscovery / VolcanoAdventures and other sources as noted.
Use of material: Most text and images on our websites are owned by us. Re-use is generally not permitted without authorization. Contact us for licensing rights.
Volcanoes & Earthquakes
VolcanoDiscovery Home
Adventure & Study Travel
Reisen zu Vulkanen und Vulkangebieten: Wanderreisen, Studienreisen, Fotoreisen Get our newsletter!
Company info
Kontakt | Impressum | AGB
Follow us
Follow us on facebook Follow us on Instagram Follow us on Twitter Visit our Youtube channel
EN | DE | EL | ES | FR | IT | RU
VolcanoDiscovery GmbH, Germany, Reg. nr.: HRB 103744, EU Tax Id: DE 310 395 322 owned and created by
Dr. Tom Pfeiffer, volcanologist, volcano photographer, tour organizer member of
IAVCEI
Volcanological Society
Ecotourism Greece
Insured by R+V
VolcanoDiscovery © 2004- All Rights Reserved | Datenschutz