Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i: current activity and eruption update

Aggiornato: 15 ago. 2022 10:11 GMT - Refresh

effusive eruption continues at fluctuating intensity

Update Mon 15 Aug 2022 04:14
The western vent in Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake yesterday (image: HVO)
The western vent in Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake yesterday (image: HVO)
Fluctuating ground deformation at Kilauea over the past week (image: HVO)
Fluctuating ground deformation at Kilauea over the past week (image: HVO)
The reference Kilauea map depicts the ongoing effusive eruption at Kilauea on 8 August (image: HVO)
The reference Kilauea map depicts the ongoing effusive eruption at Kilauea on 8 August (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption at the volcano continues.
The lava flow from the western vent continues to supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake. The surface activity, outside the lava lake, occurs from breakouts along the margins of the crater on the northeast, east, south, and west sides.
From available HVO monitoring deformation data, the ground has been fluctuating (periods of uplift and subsidence) over the past week varying between values of 1 (inflation) to -2 (deflation) microradians, as seen in the attached graph.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 1150 tonnes on 12 August.
The crater floor has risen by 136 meters since the eruption began.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 15 August 2022

ground deformation varies, currently inflating

Update Tue 19 Jul 2022 23:03
Kilauea's lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Kilauea's lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Deformation data at the volcano, the blue line refers to the recent uplift (image: HVO)
Deformation data at the volcano, the blue line refers to the recent uplift (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption at the volcano continues.
A slightly increasing inflationary trend continues at the Kilauea's summit. The previous, relatively flat deflation switched to the current uplift in the early morning of the July of 15. A short-lived ground decline has been recorded at 07:30 local time yesterday, but reverted back again into rising values.
The lava level of the active lake surface remained at the level of the bounding levees. Two lava ooze-outs have been formed at midnight and 02:00 local time tonight.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 1700 tonnes/day on 18 July.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 19 July 2022

decreasing lava lake level

Update Sun 03 Jul 2022 14:30
Lava lake level fluctuated since 30 June, currently dominated by a decreasing trend (image: HVO)
Lava lake level fluctuated since 30 June, currently dominated by a decreasing trend (image: HVO)
Deflation-inflation cycle continued until 09:00 PM yesterday (image: HVO)
Deflation-inflation cycle continued until 09:00 PM yesterday (image: HVO)
A current deflation pattern followed ground variations at the volcano beginning in the early morning on 30 June as seen in the deformation graph.
Summit tiltmeters registered a changing uplift and subsidence throughout the past two days accompanied by the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake fluctuations in depth, currently having a lowering trend.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 1100 tonnes/day on 30 June.
The western eruptive fissure vent continues to feed the active lava lake with sporadic overflows within Halemaʻumaʻu crater.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 3 July 2022

deflation-inflation pattern continues

Update Sun 26 Jun 2022 08:52
Kilauea's lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Kilauea's lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Deformation data at the volcano, the blue line refers to the recent subsidence (image: HVO)
Deformation data at the volcano, the blue line refers to the recent subsidence (image: HVO)
The depth of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake finds at a decreasing trend itself for now (image: HVO)
The depth of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake finds at a decreasing trend itself for now (image: HVO)
The reference Kilauea map depicts the ongoing effusive eruption (image: HVO)
The reference Kilauea map depicts the ongoing effusive eruption (image: HVO)
Summit instruments registered a deflation around 17:00 local time on 24 June.
From available HVO monitoring data, a steep drop in ground deformation and lava lake level may likely reflect magma flux revert again and confirms ongoing varying values. This summit deflation-inflation cycle at the volcano continues to fluctuate almost over the last week and will likely transit back to inflation soon.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 2300 tonnes/day on 24 June.
The western eruptive fissure vent continues to feed the active lava lake with sporadic overflows within Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The crater floor currently consists mostly of solidified lava including crater islands from 2020-21.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 26 June 2022

uplift followed magma intrusion at midnight

Update Tue 21 Jun 2022 18:57
Electronic tiltmeter at Uwekahuna station shows the steep rise of the ground deformation at Kilauea tonight (image: USGS)
Electronic tiltmeter at Uwekahuna station shows the steep rise of the ground deformation at Kilauea tonight (image: USGS)
The recent deflation pattern at the volcano over the last 48 hours reverted into an inflation in the midnight of 20 June.
This was followed by the ground uplift by approx. 1.5 microradians associated with the lava lake level by 3 meters indicating a rising batch of magma towards the surface.
The lava continues to keep the ooze out from the western fissure vent active along the southern and northern rim of the crater floor within the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 21 June 2022

deflation continues

Update Mon 20 Jun 2022 19:59
Deformation data at Kilauea depicts continuing deflation (image: USGS)
Deformation data at Kilauea depicts continuing deflation (image: USGS)
Depth of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake finds at decreasing trend itself for now (image: USGS)
Depth of the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake finds at decreasing trend itself for now (image: USGS)
Summit instruments detected a deflation starting around the midnight of 18 June with ground subsidence by approx. 2.5 microradians. The lava lake level has dropped by about 3 meters (10 ft) since the ground deformation started. This is most likely reflects reverts of magma batch movements under the surface leading to the lava lake sinking.
The lava flow from the western vent continues to supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake along the southern and northern rim of the crater floor.

UPDATE 20 June:
The deflation continues and the ground has sunk by 1 more microradians with the lava lake dropping by 2 meters (6 ft) over the past 24 hours.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 20 June 2022

lava flow eruption continues

Update Sat 04 Jun 2022 16:41
Thermal image of the lava flow within Halemaʻumaʻu this morning (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the lava flow within Halemaʻumaʻu this morning (image: HVO)
The activity of the volcano has been stable during the past month.
The lava flow from the western vent continues to supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake along the southern, northeastern, and northwestern rim of the crater floor.
Electronic tilt monitoring registered a summit deflation over the past 24 hours.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that the crater floor had seen a total rise of about 106 meters (348 feet) and that 77 million cubic meters (20 billion gallons) of lava had been effused since the beginning of this eruption on September 29, 2021.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 4 June 2022

Kilauea volcano (Hawaii, United States): summit eruption continues

Wed, 11 May 2022, 19:13
19:13 PM | AUTORE: LEANDRA
Kilauea webcam. Photo Credit: USGS.
Kilauea webcam. Photo Credit: USGS.
As of May 10, 2022, eruption of lava from the Halemaʻumaʻu western vent into the active lava lake and onto the crater floor has continued.

The active lava lake has shown continuous surface activity, but it's surface level has dropped slightly since May 9, 2022.

Lava ooze-out activity near the northeastern margin continued as did the activity along the southeastern margin, but the vigor of the activity decreased.
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new short-lived lava oozed out from western vent today

Update Sun 08 May 2022 01:16
Western vent continued to feed the lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano this afternoon (image: HVO webcam)
Western vent continued to feed the lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano this afternoon (image: HVO webcam)
The effusive activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues at stable levels. The lava continued to effuse over the past 24 hours near the northwestern margin of the crater floor at reduced levels compared to previous days.
A new lava flow started to spill out from the western fissure vent onto the crater floor around 07:00 local time this morning, but it seems to have stopped already.
Prior the flat ground deformation values yesterday morning, a brief deflation-inflation phase has been registered in the afternoon and evening.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 2600 tonnes/day on may 4th.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that the crater floor had seen a total rise of about 99 meters (325 feet) and that 66 million cubic meters (18 billion gallons) of lava had been effused since the beginning of this eruption on September 29, 2021.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 7 May 2022

effusive eruption remains active with sporadic breakouts

Update Fri 22 Apr 2022 15:41
The small spattering at the western fissure spatter cone (image: HVO)
The small spattering at the western fissure spatter cone (image: HVO)
The effusive activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues.
This scenario seems to continue further as indicate the current data, there are no signs to cease the eruption so far.
The lava spattering within the western fissure vent continues to feed the lava flowing into the active lava lake.
Sporadic breakouts continue along the margins of the crater to the north, northeast and south.
Tilt is currently on a inflationary trend, but fluctuated a lot with periods of deflation-inflation on 20 April.
The volcanic tremor remains above background levels, though is reduced due to the deflationary tilt trend.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 22 April 2022

Lava lake remains active

Update Mon 18 Apr 2022 06:43
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen crater rim webcam of HVO this morning
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen crater rim webcam of HVO this morning
The summit eruption at the lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues with no significant changes, the volcano observatory reported: "Surface activity continues in the active lava lake, and lava is flowing on the crater floor from the west vent region.
"In addition, lava is flowing from breakouts along the margins of the crater: north to the northeast, and a smaller one to the south. Tilt is currently on a flat trend. Lava will likely be on the surface of the active lava lake this evening."
Source: HVO / USGS

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): M 4.3 and 4.6 earthquakes today

Fri, 15 Apr 2022, 16:16
16:16 PM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Location of the quakes at Pāhala area today (image: USGS)
Location of the quakes at Pāhala area today (image: USGS)
The HVO's seismic station recorded two earthquakes with a maximum magnitude of a 4.3 and 4.6 at 01:58 local time last night.
The first M 4.3 quake was widely felt on the Island of Hawai'i and with a depth of 34 km located about 8 km NE of Pāhala, followed 8 seconds later by another, stronger magnitude-4.6 quake at 32 km depth located 9 km NE of Pāhala, slightly SE of the 1st earthquake.
The HVO reports: "These earthquakes had no apparent effect on Kīlauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes and appear to be part of the seismic swarm under the Pāhala area, which has been going on since 2019. Earthquakes in this region have been observed at least as far back as the 1960s."
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 15 April 2022

lava returned to crater

Update Thu 14 Apr 2022 14:51
Oozing lava from the western vent within the Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
Oozing lava from the western vent within the Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
Lava lake seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO this morning (image: HVO)
Lava lake seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO this morning (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues again.
The lava flow continues to spill out on the crater floor from the western fissure vent and along the eastern rim of the crater.
Tilt is currently on a flat trend.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 14 April 2022

deflation turned back to inflation today

Update Sat 09 Apr 2022 19:19
The lava within the western fissure cone with degassing activity this morning (image: HVO)
The lava within the western fissure cone with degassing activity this morning (image: HVO)
After the steep deflation process at the summit of the volcano yesterday, electronic tilt monitoring registered an inflation trend since this morning.
According to the HVO volcano observatory, the lava is expected to appear on the lava lake's surface this evening.
Source: Hawaiian volcano observatory volcano activity update 9 April 2022

Lava lake level drops as deflation kicks in

Update Fri 08 Apr 2022 06:46
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO this morning (evening of 7 April local time on Hawaii)
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO this morning (evening of 7 April local time on Hawaii)
Summit tilt showing recent deflation (image: HVO)
Summit tilt showing recent deflation (image: HVO)
The lava lake has dropped, but remains active. This follows the usual pattern of recent deflation at the summit of the volcano and will likely revert to inflation and rising lava lake levels in the near future.
The volcano observatory reported: "The summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, within Halemaʻumaʻu crater, continues at this time. The level of the active lava lake within Halema'uma'u has dropped by several meters since 6:00 p.m. yesterday, in association with summit deflation and a decline in volcanic tremor.
However, the lake surface has continued to circulate today. This activity resembles that of other summit deflationary periods in recent weeks, so lava will likely be on the surface of the active lava lake this evening."
Source: Kilauea volcano update from the Hawaiian volcano observatory (USGS)

Lava lake remains active with little changes

Update Mon 04 Apr 2022 06:03
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO
Lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater of Kilauea volcano seen on the thermal crater rim webcam of HVO
Summit tilt showing recent deflation and inflation (image: HVO)
Summit tilt showing recent deflation and inflation (image: HVO)
The summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, within Halemaʻumaʻu crater, continues with little changes over the past weeks. The lava activity in the active lava lake within Halema'uma'u crater continues to fluctuate along with inflation and deflation patterns.
As of today, the summit tilt flattened around midday (3 April local time) and remains stable, the volcano observatory reported: "Summit tremor remains elevated and steady. The level of the has not changed significantly. Based on previous observations, lava will likely be on the surface of the active lava lake this evening."
Source: Kilauea updates from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

inflation continued at reduced levels, elevated tremor

Update Sat 19 Mar 2022 05:16
Thermal view of Kilauea's lava lake with lava ooze out tonight (image: HVO / USGS thermal webcam)
Thermal view of Kilauea's lava lake with lava ooze out tonight (image: HVO / USGS thermal webcam)
The activity at the volcano continued with fluctuating inflation and deflation over the past day.
The ground subsidence (deflation) has been replaced by vertical uplift (inflation) this morning which slowed down during the day while volcanic tremor increased. This is likely reflecting continued magma intrusion and migration under the surface.
The lava lake level within Halema'uma'u crater has increased since this morning.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 18 March 2022

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): lava lake remains active, deflation likely coming to an end

Fri, 18 Mar 2022, 09:32
09:32 AM | AUTORE: T
Thermal view of Kilauea's lava lake this morning (image: HVO / USGS thermal webcam)
Thermal view of Kilauea's lava lake this morning (image: HVO / USGS thermal webcam)
Graph of tilt at Kilauea summit (image: HVO)
Graph of tilt at Kilauea summit (image: HVO)
The lava lake remains active even though the lava level has decreased during the most recent period of deflation, likely about to come to an end and probably turning into inflation very soon again.
The volcano observatory's latest update from Thursday afternoon Hawaiian time (early morning Friday in GMT) reads:
"Deflation at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano resumed around 9:30 a.m. H.S.T. this morning, and now appears to be neither deflating nor inflating. Summit tremor has also decreased but is fluctuating on short time scales.
The level of the active lava lake within Halema'uma'u crater has dropped significantly, although lava continues to enter and circulate within the main area of the active lava lake. Based on previous observations over the last week, lava will likely be on the surface of the active lava lake this evening, but activity will likely be less rigorous than earlier this week."

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): lava lake ceases to be active

Sun, 5 Dec 2021, 17:24
17:24 PM | AUTORE: T
Steaming from the crusted-over lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater at Kilauea volcano on Hawai'i (image: HVO)
Steaming from the crusted-over lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater at Kilauea volcano on Hawai'i (image: HVO)
Tilt at the summit of Kilauea over the past days showing a strong deflation at the moment (image: HVO)
Tilt at the summit of Kilauea over the past days showing a strong deflation at the moment (image: HVO)
Last night, the lava lake stopped to be active as the vent at the western rim that had been feeding the lake ceased to be active. The lava lake crusted over and is has no longer incandescent areas.
It might be a temporary pause or an end of the latest eruptive episode, which will be clearer in the coming days. Deformation shows a strong deflation of the summit, which is in agreement with magma having drained away from the shallow storage area below.

summit deflation, lava lake level has dropped

Update Thu 24 Feb 2022 02:41
Half-size crusted lava lake surface captured today (image: HVO)
Half-size crusted lava lake surface captured today (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that a deflation at the summit of the volcano has slowed and has led to a near end of the eruption at the time of this update.
The lava lake level has dropped significantly and is currently 50% crusted over. Based on previous observations, lava will likely not be on the surface of the active lava lake this evening.

fluctuating activity continues, local minor ground deformation at summit

Update Mon 21 Feb 2022 21:40
The lava flow within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
The lava flow within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues at fluctuating levels.
The lava lake is being fed by lava from the western fissure vent over the past 24 hours.
At about 10:00 local time yesterday, small and short-lived overflows have been observed at the western part of the lake followed by lava spill outs traveling to the south and west direction. Minor ooze outs occurred along the crater rim during the past 24 hours.
The summit tiltmeter detected a slight uplift (inflation) of the ground by 0.4 microradians accompanied by rapid increase between 7:30 and 13:00 local time yesterday related to lava flows from the west vent.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 21 February 2022

fluctuating phases

Update Sun 06 Feb 2022 18:23
The west vent and the lava lake looking south (image: HVO)
The west vent and the lava lake looking south (image: HVO)
The activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater continues at fluctuating levels over the past 48 hours.
The lava supply to the western fissure of the lava lake temporarily decreased on 4 February morning and afternoon associated with the deflation-inflation cycle. Another phase of reduced lava emitting began yesterday morning as a slight summit deflation has been recorded. The lava lake level has been dropped by 2-5 meters while subsidence phases.
Unlike previous pauses in the effusive activity, the discharge rate was reduced a bit causing the lake surface has not solidified and has not fully stagnated.
Multiple lava spill-outs emerged along the northern and eastern rims of the crater during the past 48 hours.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 6 February 2022

lava is back, new small cone has formed

Update Fri 28 Jan 2022 04:20
The western fissure spatter cone (right) and new small steep spatter cone built a lava shield (left) (image: HVO)
The western fissure spatter cone (right) and new small steep spatter cone built a lava shield (left) (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater resumed yesterday after several days of pause.
Lava continues to effuse from the western fissure vent, mostly occupying the small pond on the north side of the vent. One small lava flow has been oozing out along the north lava lake rim.
A weak spattering was seen at the eastern side of the crater which has built a small steep-sided spatter cone.
The seismic activity remains low with continuous volcanic tremor.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 2800 tonnes on 25 January.
There are no indications of activity migrating elsewhere on Kīlauea.

activity decreased significantly yesterday

Update Sun 23 Jan 2022 23:54
The activity is aimed within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
The activity is aimed within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu crater rapidly decreased yesterday morning.
The lava lake level dropped by 10 meters between 07:00 and 21:00 local time yesterday.
The activity is focused on a small lava pond north of the western fissure cone.
Several ooze-outs continue to be active from the eastern and northwestern crater rims.
Electronic tiltmeters monitored continuous deflation from 21 January at 17:00 local time associated with a sharp peak starting around 06:30 local time until 10:00 local time and later decreased again to low values.

lava returned to lava lake after 3 days pause

Update Thu 06 Jan 2022 17:15
The lava continues to erupt from the western fissure vent (image: HVO)
The lava continues to erupt from the western fissure vent (image: HVO)
The effusive activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater renewed after 3 days since the lava lake stopped to be active.
On 4 January at 15:00 local time, instruments started to record an inflation, followed by a rising signal of volcanic tremor at 03:40 local time yesterday and the lava returning to the Halema'ma'u crater at about 04:00 local time yesterday.
Emitting lava continues to keep the flow active from the vent at the western rim.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 6 January 2022

lava effusion stopped, restart is expected in 6-12 hours

Update Sat 01 Jan 2022 02:01
The lava effusion ceased from the western fissure vent yesterday and continues at pausing-reactivating cycles at roughly regular intervals of 1 to 3 days, but from previous observations, a resumption of the activity is expected within the next 6-12 hours.

reactivation cycles continue

Update Thu 30 Dec 2021 04:32
The lava flow at Kilauea today (image: HVO)
The lava flow at Kilauea today (image: HVO)
The effusive activity renewed after 2 days since the lava lake stopped to be active.
Following a resumption of a strongly rising volcanic tremor at around 18:50 local time yesterday, the lava came out shortly after, at around 19:10 local time.
The volcanic tremor started to decreased since 06:00 local time confirming that activity continues at reduced rate.
The lava flow continues to effuse from the western fissure vent at reduced rate. The most likely reason of the rate is formation of cooler crust on the outer half of the lake and decreasing lava velocities measured on the thermal camera as explained the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Summit tiltmeters have detected the rapid deflation since 03:00 local time.

fluctuating activity continues, lava effusion stopped

Update Tue 28 Dec 2021 02:48
The paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater yesterday (image: HVO)
The paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater yesterday (image: HVO)
The lava effusion before the pause on 25 December (image: HVO)
The lava effusion before the pause on 25 December (image: HVO)
The lava effusion ceased from the western fissure vent yesterday and continues at pausing-reactivating cycles at roughly regular intervals of 1 to 3 days. The latest timelapse video of the lava ceasing can be seen on Hawaii Tracker.

resumption of activity, lava is in Halema'ma'u crater again

Update Thu 23 Dec 2021 21:44
Lava flows are back in Halema'ma'u crater (image: Hawaii Tracker)
Lava flows are back in Halema'ma'u crater (image: Hawaii Tracker)
After 2 days since the lava lake stopped to be active again, a strongly rising signal of volcanic tremor at 19:30 local time yesterday has been detected, followed by lava returning to the Halema'ma'u crater at about 20:00 local time.
Emitting lava continues to keep the flow active from the vent at the western rim.
The lava is coming back into Halemaʻumaʻu crater as seen in the timelapse video updated on Hawaii Tracker website.

fluctuated activity, lava effusion has stopped

Update Wed 22 Dec 2021 05:09
Lava has stopped within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Lava has stopped within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues at fluctuating levels.
After pausing-reactivating cycle, the volcano entered to another pause phase yesterday as shown in the timelapse video on Hawaii Tracker.
The lava flow ceased from the western fissure vent although a glow is still visible.
Based on the previous pause periods, there are expected reactivation of the eruption in a few days.

lava returned to lava lake again after short pause

Update Tue 14 Dec 2021 22:42
Renewed activity at Kilauea volcano at midnight (image: HVO)
Renewed activity at Kilauea volcano at midnight (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake decreased significantly during the almost last 48 hours and paused yesterday, but only to restart about at 21:00 local time yesterday. The lava flows returned to the western fissure vent to supply the lake.
"Inflationary tilt was present for most of yesterday, with the onset of brief deflationary tilt just before midnight.", reported Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).
The lava is coming back into Halemaʻumaʻu crater as seen in the timelapse video updated on Hawaii Tracker website.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 14 December 2021

lava effusion has paused again

Update Tue 14 Dec 2021 03:10
The effusive activity at Kilauea volcano have paused today (image: HVO)
The effusive activity at Kilauea volcano have paused today (image: HVO)
The lava supply to the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake decreased significantly over the past 24 hours.
According to the USGS thermal and S1 camera, it seems that the lava flow feeding from the western fissure vent to have paused, which may be the result of a small surge of lava over the past day.
The reduced activity is likely supported by a summit deflation, similar to the latest eruptive pause last week.
If the lava lake would stop to be active again, this would be the 5th pause in the eruptive episode since 29 September.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 3000 tonnes/day on 9 December.
A summit inflation continued to be active yesterday evening, which may turn into another reactivation of the effusive activity.

resumption of activity, lava is back in Halema'ma'u crater

Update Wed 08 Dec 2021 08:24
Lava returned to the lava lake (image: HVO)
Lava returned to the lava lake (image: HVO)
After 3 days since the lava lake stopped to be active, lava returned to the Halema'ma'u crater at about 18:00 local time yesterday. Emitting lava flows erupting from the vent at the western rim.
The rate of the renewed effusive eruption from the western vent decreased sharply along with a dramatic reduction in tremor and the start of deflationary tilt.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) wrote: "The eastern edge of the lake that advanced onto the lowest of the exposed down-dropped caldera floor blocks remains stagnant. This is the fourth and largest such decrease in eruption vigor or pause since the eruption began on September 29 and none of the prior events lasted more than 24 hours before eruptive activity resumed."

activity slowed down during the past days

Update Wed 01 Dec 2021 05:02
Gas and steam emissions eject from the western cone (image: HVO)
Gas and steam emissions eject from the western cone (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the effusive eruption within the Halema'uma'u crater continues, but has been lower over the past few days.
Weak lava flow emissions from the western spatter cone continue to feed the lava lake. Red-to-orange incandescent patches of lava are well visible within the active portion of the lake.
SO2 and steam emissions are generated from the western fissure vent accompanied by low lava spattering.

effusive activity triggered small overflow of lava lake

Update Fri 19 Nov 2021 05:44
Lava flow onto lowest exposed Kīlauea summit down-dropped block (image: HVO)
Lava flow onto lowest exposed Kīlauea summit down-dropped block (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The eastern half is solidified at the surface, while the western portion of the lava lake is supplied by lava fountains. New lava flow from the overflow can be seen on the east side of the lava lake (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater. The eastern half is solidified at the surface, while the western portion of the lava lake is supplied by lava fountains. New lava flow from the overflow can be seen on the east side of the lava lake (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the lava flow started overflowing the lava lake levee at the western crater rim on 12 November.
Three days later, on 15 November, a new lava flow has started to descend onto the surface on the blocks.
'The lava lake surface is now at the level with the lowest of the dropped blocks remaining from the 2018 summit collapse event.', says the local observatory.
The video from lava overflowing can be seen here.

resumption of activity + timelapse video

Update Wed 10 Nov 2021 06:56
Thermal image of the western fissure vent within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: Hawaii Tracker)
Thermal image of the western fissure vent within Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: Hawaii Tracker)
According to the news from the Hawaii Tracker portal, it seems that the effusive eruption within Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake has picked up again yesterday since around 4 November as the activity slowed down.
A timelapse video over the past few days shows the slow down and resumption of the activity in the attached link

Kilauea volcano activity update: growing lava lake reached NE rim, activity slowed down

Update Thu 04 Nov 2021 06:06
Glowing cracks in the lava lake of Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Glowing cracks in the lava lake of Halemaʻumaʻu crater (image: HVO)
Volcanologist Philip Ong from our team, living in Hawaii, reported about the growing lava lake progress on Hawaii Tracker: "Just over one month into Kīlauea's second eruption in 2021, and the filling lava lake has reached the northeast inner ledge at an elevation of roughly 2585 ft or 788 m above sea level. The current eruption has added 170 ft or 52 m to the previously crusted lake, for a total thickness of 919 ft or 280 m to its deepest point since late 2020. However, the combined output of both eruptions thus far only corresponds to about 8% of the volume lost during the 2018 summit collapse."
The lava continues to effuse from the western spatter cone and has been traveling in the NE and SE direction where has submerged beneath glowing cracks in the solidified lava covering the slowly uplifting lake.
The discharge rate of this eruption seems lower compared to previous weeks since the eruption started. Nevertheless, the activity may continue for some time at reduced levels.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions continue at 3600 tonnes/day, creating volcanic smog (so-called vog) that threats local communities.

deflation has been stable for now

Update Wed 16 Mar 2022 03:46
Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
The rapid deflation at the summit of the volcano that started yesterday, has leveled off and remains stable.
The lava lake level remains low and crusted after the ground subsidence.

rapid local ground deformation

Update Tue 15 Mar 2022 03:18
The spatter cone is forming around the western vent (image: HVO)
The spatter cone is forming around the western vent (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that instruments detected significant deflation at the summit of the volcano at about 10:00 local time this morning and is still continuing at the time of this update.
The level of the active lava lake has dropped rapidly during the day.

activity paused

Update Wed 02 Mar 2022 04:07
Paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
Paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
After 15 hours since the eruption reactivated, the activity weakened significantly and ceased at 01:30 local time tonight.
Short-lived small lava ooze outs continued to emerge from the western fissure vent traveling south this morning and are no longer active so far.
Prior to the pause in the effusive activity, a steep decline of inflation at the summit started at 05:00 local time yesterday that began to slow at about 10:00 local time yesterday and remains at stable levels for now.
The lava lake level has dropped by around 10 meters over the past 24 hours.
Volcanic tremor increased at 09:30 local time yesterday and remains at elevated values.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 1 March 2022

renewed effusive activity

Update Mon 28 Feb 2022 02:02
Renewed active lava flow from the western fissure vent this afternoon (image: HVO)
Renewed active lava flow from the western fissure vent this afternoon (image: HVO)
F1 thermal camera of the lava flow this afternoon (image: HVO)
F1 thermal camera of the lava flow this afternoon (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the effusive eruption at the volcano resumed at about 10:00 local time today and at the time of this update is still continuing.
Volcanic tremor intensified at 09:30 local time today and has remained elevated at stable conditions suggesting a likelihood of delicate equilibrium.
A steep inflation at the summit decreased a bit to lower values.
The lava lake level has risen approx. by 9 meters since 08:00 local time this morning.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 27 February 2022

eruption has stopped at least for now

Update Fri 25 Feb 2022 03:48
Paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
Paused activity within Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the eruption at the volcano stopped to be active and remains paused for now.
The lava lake level has dropped significantly and remains fully crusted.
At about 08:00 local time this morning, the summit tiltmeter detected a slight uplift (inflation) of the ground by 0.8 microradians accompanied by a rapid increase at 14:45 local time today. Based on previous observations, the restart of the activity is expected within the next 6 hours.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 24 February 2022

Kilauea volcano update: yearly time-lapse video

Update Mon 01 Nov 2021 08:43
The latest F1 thermal image at Kilauea volcano on 31 October (image: HVO)
The latest F1 thermal image at Kilauea volcano on 31 October (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) published a yearly time-lapse video at Kilauea volcano from 28 October 2020 to 28 October this year. The video is made by the F1 thermal camera using one image every 8 hours.
The video involves the effusive eruption episode during December 20-May 21 and the current activity that began on 29 September.
The former water lake to have disappeared completely at the beginning of the Dec 2020 eruption and has been replaced with the growing lava lake. The current lava lake maximum elevation at the western end is approx. 795 meters (2,608 ft) by 31 October. There is about 8 meters (26 ft) elevation difference between the active west and stagnant east part of the lake measured on 27 October.
The effusive eruption at the volcano continues with small lava spattering at the western fissure. The total erupted volume since the beginning of the eruption (29 Sep) was estimated to be about 19.9 million cubic meters on October 15.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 1 November 2021

Video of lava fountains + bonus time-lapse clip of full moon over Halema'uma'u

Update Fri 22 Oct 2021 17:43
Philip Ong recorded the lava fountaining at the new lava lake in Halema'uma'u in the following video:


Aviation alert level lowered to ORANGE

Update Thu 07 Oct 2021 09:51
Close-up view of the lava fountaining at the Kilauea lava lake on Oct 5, 2021 (image: HVO / USGS)
Close-up view of the lava fountaining at the Kilauea lava lake on Oct 5, 2021 (image: HVO / USGS)
HVO lowered Kīlauea's volcano alert level to WATCH and its aviation color code to ORANGE, reflecting the less-hazardous nature of the ongoing eruption. 
Note that in our color scheme, the volcano remains "red", meaning that it is erupting at the moment.
HVO reported that "vigorous fountaining—with bursts up to 50–60 meters (164–197 ft)—produced significant amounts of pumice, Peleʻs hair, and fragments of volcanic glass that were deposited in areas downwind along the rim and beyond Halemaʻumaʻu crater.
"Over the past several days, a thick layer (approximately 27 meters or 89 ft) of molten lava has accumulated as a lava lake at the base of the crater, partially drowning the vents resulting in subdued fountaining. During the same time, the amount of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted has dropped from 85,000 tons per day (one metric ton equals 2,200 pounds) to 12,000 tons a day.
"Although the amount of gas and volcanic particle production has decreased since the eruption onset, they both remain significant local hazards within the plume. Concentrations of SO2 at the vents remain high (likely over 100 parts per million or ppm) and significantly elevated (5-10 ppm) at stations a few kilometers (a couple of miles) southwest of Halemaʻumaʻu.
"The eruption is currently confined to Halemaʻumaʻu crater, within Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.  HVO does not see any indication of activity migrating elsewhere on Kīlauea volcano  and expects the eruption to remain confined to the summit region."

Map of Kilauea volcano summit

Update Thu 07 Oct 2021 09:47
HVO published a map of the summit caldera of Kilauea showing the location of the new lava lake
HVO published a map of the summit caldera of Kilauea showing the location of the new lava lake

Halema'uma'u crater floor now filled by lava lake

Update Thu 30 Sep 2021 08:27
The lava lake at Kilauea volcano seen last night (image: USGS webcam)
The lava lake at Kilauea volcano seen last night (image: USGS webcam)
The new eruption of Kilauea has rapidly covered the whole floor of the Halema'uma'u crater with a new lava lake - impressive!

Quiet at the surface, rumblings underground

Update Wed 16 Jun 2021 04:26
This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo, looking straight down into the inactive western fissure within Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea, was captured on Thursday, June 3, 2021. One of the objectives of the UAS mission was to get a close-up look into the fissure to see if any incandescent lava was still visible. As evidenced by the darkness within the opening atop the fissure (center of frame), no active lava was observed. For scale, the height and width of this photo each span approximately 40 m (131 ft) laterally. (USGS image & caption.)
This Unoccupied Aircraft Systems (UAS) photo, looking straight down into the inactive western fissure within Halema'uma'u at the summit of Kīlauea, was captured on Thursday, June 3, 2021. One of the objectives of the UAS mission was to get a close-up look into the fissure to see if any incandescent lava was still visible. As evidenced by the darkness within the opening atop the fissure (center of frame), no active lava was observed. For scale, the height and width of this photo each span approximately 40 m (131 ft) laterally. (USGS image & caption.)
A third week of relative quiet passes on Kīlauea, though earthquakes remain slightly elevated near the volcano's summit, upper east rift, and nearby south flank. No glow is visible from the recent eruption's West Vent, nor from the crusted lava lake surface, though temperatures from the vent and a handful of small spots “around the rim and in local cavities” remain hotter than their surroundings, though still well below molten lava temperatures according to this week's USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory update.

The baseline ground tilt continues to slowly increase as it has over the past month, occasionally interrupted by less frequent deflation-inflation cycles, with one event in each of the past two weeks. The summit continues to swell based on the GPS cross-caldera distance measurement, also at a slightly increased rate for the past two weeks, and together with the ongoing seismicity intensely focused in the summit and upper east rift connector, indicates that magma is still building underground.

The upper east rift between Maunaulu and Puʻuʻōʻō, still within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, is also refilling with magma according to USGS-HVO monitoring data and reports, and does show some seismicity within the rift zone during the past week, but much less focused than in areas up-rift. Instead, there are earthquakes dispersed across the nearby south flank, suggesting that growing pressure in that part of the rift is pushing the mobile flank and distributes the seismicity across its wider base as a consequence. On the south flank, a magnitude 3.7 earthquake on June 12th occurred in the same area as the magnitudes 3.6, 3.4 and 4.2 on May 23rd, a seeming catch point at the western edge of the currently mobile area.

This pattern of adjustment is not imminently alarming, as the volcano can sustain slightly elevated activity for weeks to months before a larger change occurs, including the possibility of an eruption near the summit or currently active rift areas. The current level of seismicity is approaching that observed in the months ahead of the 2020 eruption, though it is still roughly half of the rate of the final pre-eruption weeks. The wait and watch continues, as the transition to Kīlauea's next lava showing slowly advances.

#Kilauea2021


Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Thursdays as of June 2021 and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.


Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, June 2021

"Kīlauea Volcano is no longer erupting", says USGS-HVO

Update Wed 26 May 2021 22:04
During an eruption monitoring shift on May 25, HVO field crews did not observe any active surface lava or incandescent areas within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. (USGS photo by K. Mulliken.)
During an eruption monitoring shift on May 25, HVO field crews did not observe any active surface lava or incandescent areas within Halema'uma'u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. (USGS photo by K. Mulliken.)
"Observations indicate that the eruption in Halema'uma'u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has paused. It is possible that the Halema'uma'u vent could resume eruption or that Kīlauea is entering a period of quiescence prior the next eruption."

Excerpt from the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's May 26, 2021 Daily Update:

Activity Summary: Kīlauea Volcano is no longer erupting. Observations indicate that the eruption in Halema'uma'u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has paused. This morning, May 26, the lava lake is 229 m (751 ft) deep and is stagnant across its surface. Within the past 48 hours, no active lava was observed in webcam images of the Halema'uma'u crater lava lake surface. Field crews on May 25 did not observe any signs of lava lake activity, and reported no signs of recently active surface lava. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain slightly elevated.

HVO will issue a Volcano Activity Notice (VAN) lowering the Volcano Alert Level for ground based hazards from WATCH to ADVISORY and the Aviation Color Code from ORANGE to YELLOW. HVO continues to monitor Kīlauea Volcano closely for additional signs of changes in activity.

Summit Observations: The most recent sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates, measured on May 23, were 100 tonnes per day, continuing a trend of decreased emission rates that began in mid-April. The SO2 emission rates are now nearly at levels associated with the recent non-eruptive period from late 2018 to late 2020 (less than 50 tonnes per day), and are significantly lower than emission rates that averaged over 800 tonnes per day from mid-February to mid-April. Summit tiltmeters recorded slight but continuous deflation over the past 24 hours. Seismicity remains stable, with elevated tremor.

East Rift Zone Observations: No unusual activity noted in the region. Geodetic monitors indicate that the summit and upper East Rift Zone—between the summit and Puʻuʻōʻō—is refilling at rates similar to those measured over the past 2 years and before the December 2020 eruption. SO2 and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions from Puʻuʻōʻō were below instrumental detection levels when last measured on January 7 2021.

Halemaʻumaʻu Lava Lake Observations: Observations indicate that the eruption in Halema'uma'u at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has paused. It is possible that the Halema'uma'u vent could resume eruption or that Kīlauea is entering a period of quiescence prior the next eruption. The total depth of the lake is 229 m (751 ft) as measured by a continuous laser rangefinder on the western portion of the lake near the west vent area, and is unchanged since May 11, 2021. The total volume of the lake is approximately 41.2 million cubic meters (11 billion gallons). Within the past 48 hours, no active lava was observed in webcam images of the Halema'uma'u crater lava lake surface. Field crews on May 25 observed no signs of lava lake activity, no incandescence, and no signs of recently active surface lava. Small incandescent spots visible in thermal webcam imagery since May 23 persist, but have become much fainter. The lake's surface is covered by stagnant and solidified lava crust.

Source: USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Daily Update, May 26, 2021

Lava Lake Almost Fully Crusted After 5-Months of Eruption

Update Fri 21 May 2021 07:40
Thermal image loop (24 hours) from the USGS-HVO F1 camera on May 20, 2021, the 5-month milestone since the start of the eruption.
Thermal image loop (24 hours) from the USGS-HVO F1 camera on May 20, 2021, the 5-month milestone since the start of the eruption.
The final opening in the previously liquid 112-acre molten lake is only spattering lava intermittently, with USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists reporting that “during an approximately one-hour visit to the crater rim, [the] only observation of active lava was [...] crustal foundering [...] which lasted approximately five minutes” on May 18th.

Has Kīlauea volcano stopped erupting lava, 5 months to the day after it began? The nearly complete crusting over of the open lava lake surface has made it difficult to tell, but live monitoring data of the lava lake's depth by the USGS HVO suggest no signs of injection beneath the cooling crust. Continuous measurements by a novel laser rangefinder shows no lifting of the hardened lava since one week ago on May 13th.

Beneath the crust, the core of the 229 m (752-ft) deep lava lake would remain liquid for over a century if left undisturbed, though that stability is unlikely in this dynamic volcanic landscape which exactly three years ago was in the midst of a 3-month, 500 m (1600-ft) collapse. That liquid will continue degassing, and the moving gas bubbles will carry and eject lava if they can, as is currently evident in these waning stages of eruptive activity.

Even after the crust is fully solidified, a rejuvenation of activity is still possible and fairly common among historical eruptions. Most recently, the 2018 vent in the Lower East Rift Zone now officially named Ahuʻailāʻau, ceased the bulk of its lava output on August 4th. After activity ceased within its crater, lava re-appeared briefly from September 1st to 6th, marking the final effusion of the 2018 eruption.

The volcano continues to slowly swell, and the pressure building underground could also reactivate the vent or shift the ground beneath the lake before resuming the eruption. The most recent USGS-HVO update states that based on reduced SO2 emission rates, “this implies a decrease in lava effusion rate that may indicate a coming pause in eruptive activity.” Only time will tell whether the current trend means the end of the eruption or only a temporary pause.

Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Tuesdays and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.

#Kilauea2021

Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, May 2021
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Lava Lake Divides Into Upper and Lower Ponds

Update Thu 13 May 2021 00:58
This close-up view of the active western portion of the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea was captured on Thursday, May 6 through the lens of a laser rangefinder used by HVO scientists to measure distances to features within the crater. HVO scientists observed that the area immediately surrounding the inlet to the lava lake (above-center) was slightly perched relative to the rest of the active surface, and it was intermittently feeding lava channels to lower-lying parts of the lake (below-center and below-right). The western fissure is out-of-view to the upper-left and the main island in the lava lake is out-of-view to the right. USGS caption & image (color corrected).
This close-up view of the active western portion of the Halema'uma'u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea was captured on Thursday, May 6 through the lens of a laser rangefinder used by HVO scientists to measure distances to features within the crater. HVO scientists observed that the area immediately surrounding the inlet to the lava lake (above-center) was slightly perched relative to the rest of the active surface, and it was intermittently feeding lava channels to lower-lying parts of the lake (below-center and below-right). The western fissure is out-of-view to the upper-left and the main island in the lava lake is out-of-view to the right. USGS caption & image (color corrected).
The transformation of Kīlauea's lava lake continues after a third consecutive week of crusting, which has reduced and reshaped its open lava surface. Gas emissions dropped to 150 tonnes/day on May 10 according to USGS-HVO, a new low for the eruption that has been ongoing for nearly 5-months, and well within the range of historic non-eruptive background measurements. This suggests that much less lava is erupting, and it could soon stop.

Perhaps due to the effect of lessened gas, the lava lake surface has been cooling and solidifying more quickly on its surface, and rafts of the crust continue to be carried by the liquid beneath. These have continued to stack around the lake margin, as well as the narrow points between cooling islets to form an inner perched pond near the lava inlet, essentially dividing the remaining open lava lake into upper and lower perched ponds. Now, lava rises below the West Vent and enters the inner, highest pond through a submerged inlet, before it cascades through gaps on the far side into the lower perched pond, and ultimately disappears beneath the hardening surface towards the edge of the eruption's big island. While previously the lava was seen to re-emerge along the crater walls through “ooze-up flows”, no such occurrences have been observed in nearly a month.

Deflation-inflation ground tilt cycles still continue frequently, though have been smaller in magnitude over the past week. Since these variations can visibly affect the amount of lava entering the crater, the relative stability combined with the damming effect has allowed lava levels to continue to rise within the smaller inner pond, reaching a new depth of 751 ft (229 m). However, GPS-measured caldera spreading continues, suggesting further complexity of the magmatic system as it develops following the 2018 caldera collapse.

Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Tuesdays and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.

#Kilauea2021

Lava Lake Continues Crusting

Update Tue 04 May 2021 20:06
A visual comparison of the area of active surface lava over the past two weeks. (Image: Matt Patrick, USGS-HVO)
A visual comparison of the area of active surface lava over the past two weeks. (Image: Matt Patrick, USGS-HVO)
A thermal comparison of the active surface lava over the past two weeks. (Image: Matt Patrick, USGS-HVO)
A thermal comparison of the active surface lava over the past two weeks. (Image: Matt Patrick, USGS-HVO)
In the past two weeks, Kīlauea's lava lake has crusted over nearly half of its active lava surface while gas emissions remain low, and yet the volcano continues to erupt at a low level.

Our updated estimates based on USGS imagery and map area calculations suggest close to a 50% reduction in the open lava lake surface over the past two weeks. Gas emissions over the past week ranged from 250-475 tonnes/day, similar to the previous week and less than half of the prior average during February and March.

Deflation-inflation cycles continue frequently, and as a result the lava level within the lake has only varied slightly from its unchanged average level of 227 m (745 ft). Still no no ooze-up flows observed along the lake's perimeter, next to the crater walls, over the past 3 weeks now.



Latest on Kīlauea, Eruption Day 135, Week 19:

-Active lake surface further reduced by crusting, with the 2-week total in the range of 45-50% by our unofficial estimates.

-GPS shows continued caldera spreading, with extension rate reverting back to recent average as a likely result of DI cycles.

-Seismic activity also has kept within background levels, this past week focused mainly around the summit.


Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Tuesdays and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.

#Kilauea2021

Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, April-May 2021

Lava Lake Shrinks Almost 25% In Past Week

Update Tue 27 Apr 2021 18:39
On Thursday, April 22, HVO scientists observed the ongoing eruption at the Kīlauea summit from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u. This photo shows the active western portion of the lava lake, which appears to be in the process of shrinking again, with its northeast (upper-right) and southwest (lower-left) ends crusting over substantially. For scale, the distance from the western fissure (upper-left) to the nearest part of the main island in the lake (lower-right) is approximately 180 m or 590 ft. USGS image.
On Thursday, April 22, HVO scientists observed the ongoing eruption at the Kīlauea summit from the south rim of Halema'uma'u. This photo shows the active western portion of the lava lake, which appears to be in the process of shrinking again, with its northeast (upper-right) and southwest (lower-left) ends crusting over substantially. For scale, the distance from the western fissure (upper-left) to the nearest part of the main island in the lake (lower-right) is approximately 180 m or 590 ft. USGS image.
Zoomed-in photo of the far southwest end of the active lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea's summit, captured on Thursday, April 22. USGS image.
Zoomed-in photo of the far southwest end of the active lava lake within Halema'uma'u at Kīlauea's summit, captured on Thursday, April 22. USGS image.
Kīlaueaʻs open lava lake surface has shrunk by almost 25% over the past week, and gas emissions decreased as low lava output continues.

There is still liquid lava below the newly crusted areas on the northeast and southwest lake margins, but it loses some volume as it cools, degasses and compresses. As a result, the recently stagnant surface now sits 2-3 m (7-10 ft) lower than the active lava surface nearby, which itself has slowed its rise to only 0.5 m (1.6 ft) during the past week, only to regain its previous depth of 227 m (745 ft).


Latest on Kīlauea, Eruption Day 128, Week 18:

-Active lake surface shrinking appears to continue as of this writing; our estimates based on photos and map area calculations yield reductions of ~20% in the southwest and ~5% in the northeast.
-Another Deflation-Inflation cycle begins today, after completing the third leg of a triple DI over the first half of the week. No ooze-up flows along crater walls during the past 2 weeks.
-SO2 last week measured between 300 and 550 tonnes/day (USGS), among the lowest measurements for the current eruption.
-Caldera continues spreading, according to USGS GPS, with a possible increase in the extension rate following the recent slow-down over the past month. Seismic activity still within background levels, still focused mainly below the summit and South Flank.


Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Tuesdays and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.

#Kilauea2021

Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, April 2021

Kīlauea Eruption Reaches 4-Month Milestone

Update Tue 20 Apr 2021 09:01
A close up view of the inlet at the western margin of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was covered in a thin, flexible crust and was moving at a very slow velocity. (Image & caption: USGS-HVO; M. Patrick, April 13, 2021.)
A close up view of the inlet at the western margin of the lava lake in Halema'uma'u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The lava stream was covered in a thin, flexible crust and was moving at a very slow velocity. (Image & caption: USGS-HVO; M. Patrick, April 13, 2021.)
This view from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u shows the perched lava lake, supplied by lava from the western fissure (upper right portion of photo). The levee surrounding the active lava lake is up to about 5 m (16 ft) high. (Image & caption: USGS-HVO; M. Patrick, April 13, 2021.)
This view from the south rim of Halema'uma'u shows the perched lava lake, supplied by lava from the western fissure (upper right portion of photo). The levee surrounding the active lava lake is up to about 5 m (16 ft) high. (Image & caption: USGS-HVO; M. Patrick, April 13, 2021.)
Four months since the opening of fissures within the summit crater of Halemaʻumaʻu, Kīlauea's lava output has slowed significantly, yet the volcano continues to erupt.
Its West Vent spatter cone has built over the original location of the upper western fissure, which remains above the growing, deepening lava lake thus far. Though most of the original lake surface has hardened, lava remains liquid beneath the entire crust and occasionally oozes up along its margins against the crater walls.


Latest on Kīlauea, Eruption Day 121 (Week 17):

-West Vent entry points typically submerged, and their pathways crusted over, though occasional increases in flow lead to overflows from the cones -- this week towards the crater wall, last week into the lake
-Lava lake crested at 227 m / 745 ft deep during past week (USGS); while slowly filling ~1 m / 3 ft each week, remains well below the inner-most crater rim and not visible from public areas on the ground
-Small, double Deflation-Inflation event last week; lake surface slightly lowers to 226 m / 741 ft deep
-No ooze-up flows along crater walls during past week
-GPS across summit caldera measuring continuing extension, but at a slower rate over the past month
-SO2 last week measured at 950 tonnes/day (USGS), within average range of the past 2 months
-Seismic activity below background, mostly focused below summit and South Flank

Eruption statistics so far:

-Total eruption area 44 hectares / 109 acres, active lake area down to 3 hectares / 8 acres
-Lake volume 39 Million cubic meters / 10 Billion gallons
-Unofficial estimated output over past month of roughly 0.5 m3/s, or roughly 20 cubic feet / second. First month ~10 m3/s, second month ~2 m3/s, third month ~1 m3/s. (Peak ~90 m3/s on second day; average over whole eruption ~4 m3/s from calculations based on preliminary USGS data reports.)

Discussion: USGS describes the lava stream into the lake as “covered in a thin, flexible crust and … moving at a very slow velocity.” Other than small changes in the lake entry, occasional small flows continue around the West Vent. Still no indications of any major change in the eruption apparent in monitoring signals, and the low-effusion phase continues.

Join our weekly live video review of Kīlauea's eruption! Broadcast at 5pm HST Tuesdays and archived, along with short video updates, on the Hawaiʻi PODD channel - including monitoring signals, photos & videos, time-lapses, geologic context and annotation, and discussion of live viewer questions.

#Kilauea2021

Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, December 2020 to April 2021.

Changes continue at erupting West Vent: Observations & measurements

Update Tue 13 Apr 2021 09:23
The active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema‘uma‘u crater at Kīlauea summit (Image: USGS-HVO)
The active lava lake and western vent, taken from the west rim of Halema'uma'u crater at Kīlauea summit (Image: USGS-HVO)
Kīlauea, erupting since December 20, 2020, continues a gentle effusion of lava into its summit crater, Halemaʻumaʻu, adding to a slowly filling lava lake.

Latest on Kīlauea, Eruption Day 114:

-West Vent entry fully shifted north since March 22, following change on March 5-7
-Lava pulses trigger breakouts of entry lava tube and ooze-up flows from nearby crusted lake perimeter, both at the same time
-SO2 last week measured by USGS between ~850-1000 tonnes/day, within average range of the past 2 months
-Lava lake slowly fills around 1 m / 3 ft each week, now 226 m / 741 ft deep (USGS); still well below the inner-most crater rim and not visible from public areas on the ground

Discussion: Small changes around the west vent entry continue as the lava pathway evolves under the filling lake. Otherwise, no indications of any major change in the eruption are apparent in monitoring signals, and the low-effusion phase may continue as it has for the past 2 months.

Source: Compilation and summary of USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory activity updates & online data, February, March & April 2021
Eruption continues with active lava lake
Update Mon 28 Dec 2020 20:49
Kilauea's lava lake this evening (themal webcam image of HVO)
Kilauea's lava lake this evening (themal webcam image of HVO)
The view of the lava lake on the normal webcam on the western rim (HVO)
The view of the lava lake on the normal webcam on the western rim (HVO)
According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the lava lake remains active and hasn't shown big variations over the past days.
As weak inflation continues to affect the summit caldera, more lava is being drained from the lake than added to it, but its level has only decreased a little bit. "As of 10 pm yesterday (Dec. 27), the lava lake was 177 m (581 ft) deep with a narrow black ledge around it. Reduced SO2 emissions were measured yesterday morning." (HVO)

From the latest update:
Summit Observations: Preliminary analysis of sulfur dioxide emission rates measured yesterday morning (Dec. 27) show that the rates are still about 5,500 tonnes/day--lower than the 40,000 t/d for the first three days of the eruption, but still elevated. Summit tiltmeters continued to record weak inflationary tilt. Seismicity remained elevated but stable, with steady elevated tremor and a few minor earthquakes.

East Rift Zone Observations: Geodetic monitors also indicate that the upper portion of the East Rift Zone contracted while the summit deflated. This was associated with magma withdrawal to feed the summit vents. There is no seismic or deformation data to indicate that magma is moving into either of Kīlauea's rift zones.

Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake Observations: The west vent continued erupting lava into a lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater with two or three narrow channels visible this morning.

The lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu crater has changed little in the past day and was about 177 m (581 ft) deep and about 408 m (1,340 ft) below the south Halemaʻumaʻu rim as of this morning (Dec. 28). The lake volume was about 21.5 million cubic meters (28 million cubic yards or 4.9 billion gallons). The most recent thermal map (Dec. 26) provided the lake dimensions as 790 by 520 m (864 by 569 yds) for a total area of 29 ha (72 acres). The narrow (10-30 m or 11-22 yd) ledge around the lake was about 1-2 m (1-2 yds) above the active lake surface suggesting that the lake surface dropped over the past 2 days (https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/december-26-2020-k-lauea-summit-eruption-thermal-map)

Over the past day, the main island of cooler, solidified lava floating in the lava lake drifted slowly westward in the lake and measured about 225 m (740 ft) in length and 110 m (360 ft) in width based on the Dec. 26 thermal map (https://www.usgs.gov/maps/december-26-2020-k-lauea-summit-eruption-thermal-map). This morning, the island began drifting back to the east. Measurements yesterday evening (Dec. 27) show that the island surface was about 6 m (20 ft) above the lake surface.
---

Source: HVO daily updates
Eruption goes on while lava lake reaches equilibrium for now
Update Sat 26 Dec 2020 19:44
Activity of the northern vent of Kilauea's lava lake yesterday (image: HVO)
Activity of the northern vent of Kilauea's lava lake yesterday (image: HVO)
Summit tilt showing that weak inflation has started (image: HVO)
Summit tilt showing that weak inflation has started (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the lava lake this evening (morning in Hawaii) (image: HVO thermal webcam)
Thermal image of the lava lake this evening (morning in Hawaii) (image: HVO thermal webcam)
The new eruption continues with little changes, but the rapidly formed lava lake in the summit collapse crater might have reached an equilibrium between magma influx and drain, as it has only increased little during the past 24 hours.
The volcano observatory reported: "As of 2 pm yesterday, the crater lake was still 176 m (577 ft) deep and the lake level appeared to be 2 m (6 ft) lower leaving a narrow black ledge around the north edge. Early this morning, the west vent reactivated while the north vent quieted and started to drain the lake. Reduced SO2 emissions were measured last night."
Deflation of the summit (as a result from magma being emptied from internal storage into the lake) has stopped for now and shifted to a slow trend of inflation. This would correspond to increased internal vs external magma storage, i.e. more magma is being withheld in the underground storage system than is being erupted to the surface.
It will be interesting to see if the current lava lake will follow a similar pattern as the last one, active from 2008-18, with alternating phases of inflation and deflation each lasting a few days typically, so called inflation-deflation cycles. During each such cycle, the level of the lava lake fluctuates on the order of few meters.
Another possibility is that magma intrudes into horizontal storage systems, especially the very active eastern rift zone. Whether and if so, when, this might happen cannot be predicted at the moment. Kilauea's summit lava lakes can be stable for any period ranging from days to years or even decades.
Lava lake growing rapidly, already more than 175 m deep!
Update Fri 25 Dec 2020 19:24
Kilauea's new lava lake on Christmas Day morning (image: HVO webcam)
Kilauea's new lava lake on Christmas Day morning (image: HVO webcam)
The new eruption of the world's most active volcano continues with no significant change, but at breathtaking speed as the new lava lake grows and is about to inundate its vents.
According to the USGS'Hawaiian volcano observatory (HVO), the lava lake 176 m (577 ft) deep at 7 am local time this morning. The lake inside Halema'uma'u crater is being fed by two vents on the north and northwest sides of the crater. The fresh magma rising to the surface is carrying with it a lot of SO2 gas, being released into the atmosphere as a dense plume.
We compiled a video of the lava lake as recorded by the thermal camera on the western rim, summarizing 4 days in one minute, showing the impressive speed the lava lake has been growing:

From the latest status update of HVO:

Summit Observations:
Summit tiltmeters continued to record steady deflationary tilt. Sulfur dioxide emission rates remain high estimated at around 35,000-40,000 tonnes/day as measured on Monday (Dec. 21) and revised Wednesday (Dec. 23). Seismicity remained elevated but stable, with a few minor earthquakes and tremor fluctuations related to the vigor of fissure fountaining.

Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake observations:
Two vents continued erupting on the north and northwest walls of Halemaʻumaʻu. The west vent, which is located on the lowest down-dropped block within Halemaʻumaʻu crater, was intermittently spattering. The north vent remains the most vigorous and is being slowly drowned by the rising lake.
The vents continued to feed lava into a rapidly enlarging lava lake filling Halemaʻumaʻu crater. As of early this morning, the lake was 176 m (577 ft) deep--an increase of 6 m (20 ft) over the previous 24 hrs. The lava lake volume this morning (Dec. 25) was about 21 million cubic meters (27 million cubic yards or 4.8 billion gallons).
An island of cooler, solidified lava within the lava lake has been getting smaller and drifting slowly northeastward in the lake. It is about 260 m (850 ft) in length and 115 m (375 ft) in width based on the Dec. 23rd thermal map (https://www.usgs.gov/maps/december-23-2020-k-lauea-summit-eruption-thermal-map)."
Eruption goes on, lava lake growing
Update Tue 22 Dec 2020 20:53
View of the Kilauea crater in the morning of 22 Dec 2020 (image: HVO)
View of the Kilauea crater in the morning of 22 Dec 2020 (image: HVO)
Thermal image from this morning showing the now single vent feeding the lake (image: HVO)
Thermal image from this morning showing the now single vent feeding the lake (image: HVO)
The new eruption continues at steady pace: during the first day of activity, lava effusion focused on only one of the initially 3 fissure vents in the lower crater walls, something that is often the case as the rising magma tends to exploit the best-available path, now clear of obstacles.
The lava effuses from the active fissure with little explosive interaction into a flow that continues to fill the growing lava pond at the bottom of the crater. Once the vent is submerged, we might be able to adore another true lava lake in Halema'uma'u!
Spectacular photo showing onset of eruption
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 19:19
Steam and ash plume from last night's beginning of the new eruption at Kilauea volcano ( image taken at approximately 10:30 p.m., 12/20/20, NPS Photo/J. Wei)
Steam and ash plume from last night's beginning of the new eruption at Kilauea volcano ( image taken at approximately 10:30 p.m., 12/20/20, NPS Photo/J. Wei)
Shortly after the eruption began, lava erupted form the new fissures inside the summit crater came in direct contact with the existing water lake. The result was a very explosive interaction that evaporated the lake completely, now being replaced by a pond of lava.
The Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park posted a spectacular image showing this activity. The explosions between lava and water not only generated massive amounts of steam, but also fragmented lots of rock and lava material, generating a tall steam and ash plume that rose to approx. 9000 m initially. By now, this activity has died out as most available water disappeared.
Lava replaces water lake
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 18:28
Image of the Halema'uma'u crate with the approx. location of the new vents (image: HVO)
Image of the Halema'uma'u crate with the approx. location of the new vents (image: HVO)
Annotated aerial image of the caldera as on 29 May 2020 for orientation and comparison (image: HVO)
Annotated aerial image of the caldera as on 29 May 2020 for orientation and comparison (image: HVO)
The volcano observatory posted a vertical image with the approximate location of the new vents, 3 in total, on the lower NW walls of the Halema'uma'u pit crater.
In the attached image, "the red spots are the approximate locations of fissure vents feeding lava flowing into the bottom of Halema'uma'u crater.
The water lake at the base of Halema'uma'u crater has been replaced with a growing lava lake. Lava coverage is deeper by 10 m (32 ft) or larger and bigger in extent than the water in this photo (base map is from imagery collected on September 23, 2020). The easternmost vent is currently exhibiting fountains up to approximately 50 m (164 ft) high with minor fountaining on the west side. Occasion blasts of uncertain origin are occurring from lava lake surface." (HVO / USGS update)
Link to USGS / HVO multimedia material
Caldera responds with rapid deflation
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 17:33
Summit tilt showing rapid deflation (image: HVO)
Summit tilt showing rapid deflation (image: HVO)
Following the gradual inflation of the caldera, the tiltmeters now indicate that rapid deflation has accompanied the onset of the new eruption.
This would have been expected, actually: as magma was stored at shallow depths, both earthquakes increased and as pressure built up in the storage system, the caldera widened a little bit (on the scale of mm, unnoticeable to the eye but readily recorded by today's sensitive instruments). As the magma finally erupted to the surface, the decrease of pressure now caused a rapid contraction.
Eruptive fissures in the lower walls of the summit pit crater
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 17:18
View of the eruptive site in the morning from the western rim of the Halema'uma'u collapse crater (image: HVO webcam)
View of the eruptive site in the morning from the western rim of the Halema'uma'u collapse crater (image: HVO webcam)
As dawn breaks over Kilauea volcano, some details about the new eruption can be seen: the new vents are eruptive fissures in the western and northwestern lower walls of the pit crater. They produce low lava fountains that feed flows that have been creating a pool of lava at the bottom of the crater.
The former water lake seems to have disappeared completely. Likely, scientists from the volcano observatory will report a more detailed update in the coming hours.
Thermal image
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 17:24
Thermal image of the eruption site in the morning of 21 Dec 2020 (image: thermal webcam on western rim of Halema'uma'u, HVO)
Thermal image of the eruption site in the morning of 21 Dec 2020 (image: thermal webcam on western rim of Halema'uma'u, HVO)
The thermal image of the crater shows the activity better than the visual: at least two fissure vents are still active in the lower walls, feeding flows that have created a new lava pond at the bottom of the crater.
Lava fountaining from the Haleama'uma'u pit crater
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 09:59
Lava fountains from the bottom of the deep pit crater in Kilauea's Halema'uma crater, from the west rim of the collapse crater (image: HVO)
Lava fountains from the bottom of the deep pit crater in Kilauea's Halema'uma crater, from the west rim of the collapse crater (image: HVO)
Livecam imagery shows what seems to be lava fountaining from vents at the bottom of the Halema'uma'u pit crater, where the water lake had been until yesterday.
New eruption in summit caldera
Update Mon 21 Dec 2020 09:31
Glow from Kilauea's Halema'uma'u crater
Glow from Kilauea's Halema'uma'u crater
The eruption which has started about 2 hours ago inside the summit caldera is now producing a strong glow from the Haleama'uma'u crater.
The exact location of the new vents is not clear yet. The most likely candidate is the deep pit crater which had contained the lava lake until the eruption in 2018 and was refilled with a slowly growing hot water lake. The presence of water is likely causing significant explosive interaction (phreatomagmatic activity) of water and magma.

Background, preceding activity prior to 20 Dec 2020 eruption

USGS posted the following summary with interesting information about the activity at the volcano during the weeks preceding today's new eruption:

"For the past several weeks, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) has recorded ground deformation and earthquake rates at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and upper East Rift Zone that have exceeded background levels observed since the conclusion of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse.

"Beginning in September 2020, increased rates of uplift were observed by GPS stations in Kīlauea's upper East Rift Zone. In the past month, increased uplift has also been measured at GPS stations in Kīlauea's summit region. While uplift related to post-collapse inflation of the summit reservoir has been occurring since March of 2019, rates have been steadily increasing in recent months and are currently higher than they have been since the end of the 2018 eruption.

In late November 2020, increased earthquake rates began when seismic stations recorded an average of at least 480 shallow, small-magnitude earthquakes (97% of which were less than or equal to magnitude-2) per week occurring at depths of less than 4 km (2.5 miles) beneath Kīlauea's summit and upper East Rift Zone. This compares to a rate of fewer than 180 per week following the end of Kīlauea's 2018 eruption and through early November 2020.

On December 2, 2020, GPS stations and tiltmeters recorded a ground deformation event at Kīlauea's summit. Accompanied by earthquake swarms, the patterns of ground deformation observed were consistent with a small dike intrusion of magma under the southern part of Kīlauea caldera. The injection resulted in about 8 cm (3 inches) of uplift of the caldera floor, and modeling suggests that it represented 0.4–0.7 million cubic meters (yards) of magma accumulated approximately 1.5 km (1 mile) beneath the surface. Though the intrusion did not reach the surface and erupt, it represented a notable excursion from trends observed in Kīlauea summit monitoring data streams following the end of the 2018 eruption.

On December 17, 2020, seismometers detected a notable increase in occurrence and duration of long-period seismic signals beneath Kīlauea's summit, which are attributed to magmatic activity. Whereas this type of seismicity was observed on average once every few weeks following the 2018 eruption, rates have increased to over a dozen in the past several days.

Other monitoring data streams including volcanic gas and webcam imagery were stable until this eruption.

An earthquake swarm began on the evening of December 20, accompanied by ground deformation detected by tiltmeters. An orange glow was subsequently observed on IR monitoring cameras and visually beginning approximately 21:36 HST."

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i) activity field report: full moon over erupting Halema'uma'u crater this morning

Fri, 22 Oct 2021, 07:43
07:43 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Full moon illuminates the eruption site at dawn with Mauna Loa in the background (image: Philip Ong)
Full moon illuminates the eruption site at dawn with Mauna Loa in the background (image: Philip Ong)
Full moon illuminates the eruption site at dawn with Mauna Loa in the background (image: Philip Ong)
Full moon illuminates the eruption site at dawn with Mauna Loa in the background (image: Philip Ong)
First sun rays reached Mauna Loa and Halema'uma'u crater this morning (image: Philip Ong)
First sun rays reached Mauna Loa and Halema'uma'u crater this morning (image: Philip Ong)
Philip Ong and Martin Kelko from our team followed the eruption at Kilauea at dawn and dusk over the last few days.
Weather at the eruption site was pretty rare this morning as has been also reported on the Hawaii Tracker's latest report: 'On an unusually clear morning for 2021, the sunrise paints Maunaloa and the setting full moon, as Kīlauea's eruption continues within Halemaʻumaʻu crater.'
The effusive eruption at the volcano is ongoing. Low-level spattering is seen from the western fissure, which continues to build the horseshoe-shaped spatter cone. Small lava fountains, about 5 meters tall, with occasional bursts up to 10 meters, are feeding lava flowing into the growing Halema'uma'u crater.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions remain elevated at approx. 2700 tonnes/day measured on 17 October.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the lava lake is not level across its surface due to the location of the vent in the western end. There is about 8 meters elevation difference between the active west and stagnant east part of the lake.
Seismic recordings show continuous ground vibration (volcanic tremor) as magma pushes its way towards the surface since the eruption started.

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): increased lava fountains, new short-lived vent opened

Thu, 14 Oct 2021, 16:13
16:13 PM | AUTORE: MARTIN
New short-lived vent opened to the north (right) of the active western fissure (image: HVO)
New short-lived vent opened to the north (right) of the active western fissure (image: HVO)
An intense fountaining activity took place at the main western fissure on 12 October.
A vigorous lava spattering, pulsating to 10 m-15 m (30 ft-50 ft) height, was interrupted by constant lava fountains exceeding the height of the cone (30 m/100 ft).
The lava flows continue to feed the active west half of the Halemaʻumaʻu lake. The west side of the lake is perched above the stagnant eastern lake surface, with several lava overflows advancing over the previously solidified surface crust.
A new short-lived vent opened, related to the increased fountaining activity, to the north of the active western fissure. The activity at this vent lasted about 10 hours with small lava fountains about 3 meters tall.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 14 October 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): western fissure continues to supply Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake

Mon, 11 Oct 2021, 16:28
16:28 PM | AUTORE: MARTIN
C-shaped cinder cone above the western fissure vent (image: HVO)
C-shaped cinder cone above the western fissure vent (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano resumes and has remained essentially unchanged since the last update.
Fountaining, about 49 ft (15 m) tall, continues from the only western fissure vent as the lava supply from the chain of vents stretching from the lake's center to its southern margin has ceased over the past few days.
The lava spattering continues to build the spatter cone above the eruptive fissure.
The western end of the lake shows a maximum elevation of approximately 780 meters (2559 ft) above sea level as measured by field crews on October 9, which is a 1 meter (3ft) increase over the past day and a total increase of about 37 meters (121 ft) since lava emerged on September 29.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that "The central island and several of the smaller eastern islets from the 2020 lava lake are still above the lake surface along with an island of the 2020 western vent rampart in the northwest part of the lake. The lava lake is not level across its surface due to the location of the vent in the western end. Areas closer to the vent are about 1-2 meters (3-7 ft) higher in elevation compared to the north and south part of the lake and 8 meters (26 ft) higher than the east end of the lava lake. Crustal foundering is mainly focused on the western part of the lava lake with lava flowing north and south around the central island through narrow cascades to reach parts of the eastern end of the lake."
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions remain elevated at approx. 5300 tonnes/day measured on 8 October.
The seismic activity remains elevated but stable.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 11 October 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): fountaining dominates at western fissure

Wed, 6 Oct 2021, 05:08
05:08 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
The western vent (lower right) remains the dominant source of fountaining, while low lava fountains are still emerging through the southern portion of the lava lake (center right) (image: HVO)
The western vent (lower right) remains the dominant source of fountaining, while low lava fountains are still emerging through the southern portion of the lava lake (center right) (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues within the Halemaʻumaʻu crater.
The activity is mainly focused at the western fissure where vigorous lava spattering has been building a horseshoe-shaped spatter cone around the vent. Low lava fountains continue to erupt from the chain of vents stretching from the lake's center to its southern margin.
The lava lake crust develops a complex pattern as it flows away from its source at the western vent.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions remain elevated at approx. 7000 tonnes/day measured yesterday.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 6 October 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): Volcanic Alert Level lowered to Orange, vigorous fountaining continues

Tue, 5 Oct 2021, 05:46
05:46 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
C-shaped spatter cone at the western fissure in Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
C-shaped spatter cone at the western fissure in Halemaʻumaʻu crater today (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues.
Vigorous lava fountains reached by lava jets surpassed 50 m-60 m (164 ft-197 ft) and produced amounts of pumice, Peleʻs hair and volcanic glass fragments downwind along the rim and beyond Halemaʻumaʻu crater.
Over the past several days, a thick layer (approximately 27 meters or 89 ft) of molten lava has accumulated as a lava lake at the base of the crater, partially drowning the vents resulting in subdued fountaining.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions decreased to a 12,000 t/d. Although the amount of gas and volcanic particle production has decreased since the eruption onset, they both remain significant local hazards within the plume.
However, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) lowered the alert level for the volcano to "orange".
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 4 October 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): lava lake grows at low-level fountaining

Sat, 2 Oct 2021, 04:49
04:49 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Lava fountains create waves in the lake surface (image: HVO)
Lava fountains create waves in the lake surface (image: HVO)
Fountaining on the western crater wall at 18:00 local time yesterday (image: HVO)
Fountaining on the western crater wall at 18:00 local time yesterday (image: HVO)
Several vents stretching from the lake's center to its southern margin (right) and fissure in the western wall (bottom right) (image: HVO)
Several vents stretching from the lake's center to its southern margin (right) and fissure in the western wall (bottom right) (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues and remains active within the Halemaʻumaʻu crater.
Fountaining continues at two locations, from several vents stretching from the lake's center to its southern margin and from the western wall of the summit crater.
The discharge rate of lava fountains, which continue to feed the growing lava lake, seems rather low compared to the previous day. Less vigorous fountains reached heights of 15 meters yesterday. Lava fountains through the lava lake create waves or ripples in the lake surface. The ripples are visible on the surface as thin crustal plates move apart and back together again as the wave motion passes by (like inner tubes in a crowded wave pool), creating a moving arc of increased glow, reported the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO).
The lava lake surface has risen about 4 meters over the past 24 hours and has risen approx. 24 meters since the eruption started. Localized and discontinuous crustal foundering continues (a process by which cool lava crust on the surface of the lava lake is overridden by less-dense liquid from below causing the crust to sink into the underlying lake lava).
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 20,000 tonnes/day yesterday which is significantly lower than origin emissions rates (85,000 t/d) detected at the beginning of the eruption.
Volcanic-seismic tremor continues at stable levels associated with few quakes.
The HVO warning bulletin states: "High levels of volcanic gas are the primary hazard of concern, as this hazard can have far-reaching effects down-wind. Large amounts of volcanic gases — water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are continuously released during the eruption. As SO2 is released from the summit, it reacts in the atmosphere to create the visible haze known as vog (volcanic smog). Vog creates the potential for airborne health hazards to residents and visitors, damages agricultural crops and other plants, and affects livestock."
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 2 October 2021

Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i: New Eruption Filling Summit Crater

Fri, 1 Oct 2021, 01:19
01:19 AM | AUTORE: T
New lava lake in the summit crater of Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i (image: USGS)
New lava lake in the summit crater of Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i (image: USGS)
Geologist Philip Ong from our team on Hawai'i published the following summary of the start of the new eruption on Hawai'i on Hawaii Tracker:
New eruptive fissures opened inside Halemaʻumaʻu crater at Kīlauea volcano's summit at 3:20pm on Wednesday, September 29th, 2021, and by this next morning have filled the crater with approximately 60 feet, or 18 meters of additional lava, covering an area of 112 acres or 45 hectares.
The lava lake, crusted and cooling since the end of the most recent eruption in May, finally seems poised to rise enough to be visible to visitors from public overlooks within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, where the eruption is wholly contained and posing little threat to people apart from its gas.
Following last month's intrusion under the south caldera, seismic activity dwindled even as ground inflation quickly resumed, suggesting that magma continued to supply to the volcano from below without interruption. Finally, the volcano reached a breaking point, suddenly expressing a quick rise in ground tilt along with a swarm of earthquakes, the largest of which registered as a magnitude 3.1, and within an hour lava was spotted at the surface by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webcams. The USGS correspondingly raised Kīlauea's alert status, first from Yellow/Advisory to Orange/Watch, and shortly thereafter to the current Red/Warning level.
Time-lapse captures from the USGS webcams show that fissures emerged through the center and at the edges of the crusted lava lake, which still retained a core of liquid lava, as well as through the wall of the crater producing several lava cascades into the quickly-rising lake. The initial and largest fountains appear just east of the famous large lava island left over from the previous eruption, quickly flooding and covering almost the whole crater floor with fresh lava, drowning all the lava terraces and islets that made up the previous surface. The last eruption's West Vent was also surrounded, but the lighter cinder material now appears to have been buoyed upwards after an injection of lava at its base, possibly forming a new, smaller lava island.
The original bigger lava island also appears to have detached from the previous hardened crust now, seen to float upwards as the lava level rises this morning.
As during the December 2020 eruption, the initial rates of lava output are fairly high, but likewise may not be sustained. Ultimately, that factor will largely determine the course of Kīlauea's newest eruption. We will continue to report and annotate the changes in the coming days, sharing both USGS and citizen science observations.

Source: Hawaii Tracker

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): new eruption in Halemaʻumaʻu crater, Volcanic Alert Level raised to Red

Thu, 30 Sep 2021, 05:26
05:26 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
New eruptive fissures of the current eruption site of Kilauea volcano. Western fissure is visible in the left side of the image (image: HVO)
New eruptive fissures of the current eruption site of Kilauea volcano. Western fissure is visible in the left side of the image (image: HVO)
Thermal image depicts fissures opened on the surface of the recently active lava lake (image: HVO)
Thermal image depicts fissures opened on the surface of the recently active lava lake (image: HVO)
Estimated locations of new eruptive fissures (image: HVO)
Estimated locations of new eruptive fissures (image: HVO)
A rapid rise of seismic activity and vertical deformation has been detected by the volcano observatory Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) as of noon today which is a sign that magma has been continued to intrude and pushed its way into deeper rock layers.
Onset of a new eruption started at the volcano in the afternoon of 29 September at about 15:20 local time as the observatory detected a glow in the Kilauea summit crater.
New eruptive fissures opened at approx. 15:21 local time at the bottom of the Halemaʻumaʻu crater. These fissures opened east of the large island near the center of the lava lake. The opening of the vents was accompanied by low lava fountains and feeding new lava flows.
At about 16:43 local time, another vent opened on the west wall of the crater.
Gas and steam emissions continue at elevated levels.
Therefore, the alert level for the volcano was raised to "red".
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 29 September 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): recent magma inflation lifts caldera by up to 18 cm

Fri, 3 Sep 2021, 14:50
14:50 PM | AUTORE: T
Radar-measured changes of the ground elevation between Aug 19, and Sep 1, 2021, calculated by the difference between two radar images taken by the Italian COSMO-SkyMed satellite on these dates. Each colored ring cycle corresponds to a vertical movement of the surface of 1.55 cm (image: HVO / USGS)
Radar-measured changes of the ground elevation between Aug 19, and Sep 1, 2021, calculated by the difference between two radar images taken by the Italian COSMO-SkyMed satellite on these dates. Each colored ring cycle corresponds to a vertical movement of the surface of 1.55 cm (image: HVO / USGS)
New satellite data shows that the summit of the caldera has uplifted by up as much as 18 cm during the recent earthquake swarms, which supports the interpretation that they had been caused by pulses of magma that intruded at shallow depth, thus causing the inflation of the ground above.
The inflation continues at slow rate while earthquake rates are back to normal levels, suggesting that the volcano-tectonic events have come to (at least a temporary) end.

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): ground deformation decreased, but eruption warning continues

Sun, 29 Aug 2021, 21:08
21:08 PM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim on 13 August (image: HVO)
Halema‘uma‘u from the western crater rim on 13 August (image: HVO)
The intrusive activity that began on 23 August continues south of Kilauea caldera.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that ground deformation in Kilauea's south summit region continues, though at a rate slightly lower than the rates seen in the first intrusive pulse spanning August 23-25. The rate of ground deformation beneath the south part of Kilauea summit region, within Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, decreased slightly in the evening of 28 August.
The seismic activity continues at reduced levels compared to the earlier pulses of this intrusive activity. The seismic station recorded approx. 95 volcano-tectonic earthquakes at volcano summit and south of the caldera over the past 24 hours. Most of the earthquakes were less than magnitude 2 and occurred approximately 1-4 km (0.6-2.5 mi) below the surface.
New magma has accumulated under the caldera and there is still an increased possibility that it might lead up to an eruption in a near future.
Volcano Alert Level and Aviation Color Code remain at Advisory/Yellow. 
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 29 August 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): seismic swarm weakens, but alert remains in place

Thu, 26 Aug 2021, 16:02
16:02 PM | AUTORE: T
Quakes under Kilauea as a function of time
Quakes under Kilauea as a function of time
The seismic swarm under the southern caldera has been weakening: the number and size of quakes have decreased significantly.
During the past 24 hours, "only" about 50 small quakes, all of magnitudes of less than 3 occurred in this area. This is compared to over 300 events that occurred over a 24 hour period during the peak of the swarm two days ago.
However, it is not over quite yet. Almost certainly, new magma has accumulated under the caldera and there is still an increased possibility that it might lead up to an eruption in a near future.

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): strong seismic swarm suggests magma intrusion at shallow depth, alert level raised

Tue, 24 Aug 2021, 17:41
17:41 PM | AUTORE: T
Recent quakes under the caldera of Hawai'i's Kilauea volcano
Recent quakes under the caldera of Hawai'i's Kilauea volcano
An intense earthquake swarm is in progress under the southern part of the Kilauea caldera, prompting the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) to raise the alert status to "orange", as the earthquakes might indicate that magma is intruding at shallow depths and might lead to a new eruption in the near future.
The seismic swarm began on the evening of Aug 23, 2021, and is currently continuing. During the past 24 hours, there were more than 140 quakes detected in total, including 41 quakes of magnitudes 2.0 or higher. Most tremors occurred at shallow depths around 2-3 km under the surface.
A particularly strong sequence of earthquakes occurred at about 1:30 a.m., HST local time, with a magnitude 3.6 event at 1.36 a.m.
The Hawaiian reported that "The onset of the earthquake swarm was coincident with a change in the style of ground deformation at tiltmeters in the Kīlauea summit region, potentially indicating the shallow movement of magma beneath the south part of Kīlauea caldera."
"HVO will continue to monitor this activity closely and adjust the alert level accordingly."

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): earthquake beneath southern flank

Mon, 24 May 2021, 06:54
06:54 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Distribution of earthquakes beneath Kilauea volcano including the latest M 4.2 event as red arrow shows (image: HVO)
Distribution of earthquakes beneath Kilauea volcano including the latest M 4.2 event as red arrow shows (image: HVO)
The seismic network of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a volcano-tectonic earthquake with magnitude M 4.2 at 7,5 km depth beneath the southern flank of the volcano yesterday at 11:41 local time. The earthquake was centered about 15 km (9 miles) south of Volcano, under the Hilina Pali area of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.
Weak to light shaking, with maximum Intensity of IV on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, has been reported across the Island of Hawai'i.
According to HVO Scientist-in-Charge Ken Hon, the earthquake had no apparent effect on Kīlauea or Mauna Loa volcanoes. “We see no detectable changes in activity at the summits or along the rift zones of Kīlauea or Mauna Loa as a result of this earthquake. Aftershocks are possible and could be felt.”
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 24 May 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): lava lake crusting continues

Tue, 18 May 2021, 07:29
07:29 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Lava lake surface within Halema‘uma‘u crater continues crusting (image: HVO)
Lava lake surface within Halema‘uma‘u crater continues crusting (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues characterized by the transformation of Kīlauea's lava lake into continuous crusting.
The lava lake within Halema'uma'u crater remains active, although surface incandescence has become less frequent over the last few days.
As can be seen in the attached image, two elongated lobes oriented west (left) to east (right) with a relatively smooth shiny grey surface are visible in the center of the photo. These two lobes comprise the active area of the current lava lake. A tiny red glow is visible along the southern (bottom) margin of the northern (top) elongated lobe, toward the middle.
The lava flow, feeding from the western fissure vent, continues to effuse into the lava lake. The current lava lake depth is 751 ft (229 m).
Gas emissions and seismic activity remain at elevated levels.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 18 May 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): new developed pond entered into main lava lake

Fri, 12 Mar 2021, 07:54
07:54 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
The pond has developed a subtle levee on its south margin (below the center of the photo). (image: HVO)
The pond has developed a subtle levee on its south margin (below the center of the photo). (image: HVO)
According to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) a small lava pond developed near the western fissure during 5-7 March.
On 7 March at about 13:00 local time a levee of the pond started to collapse allowing the pond lava to drain into the main lake. The lake has developed a subtle levee on its south margin (just below the center of the photo), with several lava streams cascading down onto the lower level on the eastern end of the levee.
A new lava flow was active north of the normal lava flow entering the lake. This new lava flow was perched above the lake surface, and fed a narrow channel entering the lake. The new stream was set within a collapse scar that resulted from the collapse of a small lava pond.
Minor changes in the geometry of the western fissure, like this, happen occasionally.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 12 March 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): activity remains unchanged; lava flow continues to feed lava lake

Mon, 8 Mar 2021, 10:26
10:26 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
A small incandescent opening at the top of the west vent spatter cone (bottom-center) including gas plume (image: HVO)
A small incandescent opening at the top of the west vent spatter cone (bottom-center) including gas plume (image: HVO)
Aerial view of Kīlauea's summit from 4 March (image: HVO)
Aerial view of Kīlauea's summit from 4 March (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues and no significant change in activity has occurred since the last update.
The western portion of the lava lake in Halema'uma'u crater remains active and is supplied by the lava flow from the western fissure of the spatter cone. A small incandescent opening at the top of the west vent spatter cone is visible in the attached image.
The inactive eastern portion of the lake appears dark.
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions remain at elevated levels and reached to a 1000 tonnes/day on 3 March as a result of the ongoing eruption. Volcanic gas emissions from the active west vent are being transported to the southwest.
On 4 March, HVO scientists conducted an overflight of Kīlauea's summit to document the ongoing eruption.
Laser rangefinder measurements indicate that lava has filled about 220 meters (772 ft) of Halema'uma'u.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 8 March 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): effusive eruption continues

Fri, 12 Feb 2021, 10:41
10:41 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Picture shows the active western (left) portion of the lava lake, which has hot incandescent lava visible at boundaries between plates on the lava lake. The inactive eastern (right) portion of the lake appears dark (image: HVO)
Picture shows the active western (left) portion of the lava lake, which has hot incandescent lava visible at boundaries between plates on the lava lake. The inactive eastern (right) portion of the lake appears dark (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues and has remained essentially unchanged.
The western fissure continues to supply the lava into the growing Halema'uma'u lava lake.
The active western portion of the lava lake has hot incandescent lava (as can be seen in attached image) visible at boundaries between plates on the lava lake. The inactive eastern portion of the lake appears dark.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 12 February 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): moderate earthquake on south flank

Tue, 2 Feb 2021, 07:50
07:50 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Red arrow shows the location of the earthquake M 4.1 on 1 Feb; red frame in the upper right corner of image shows magnitude, depth and date/time of the earthquake (image: HVO)
Red arrow shows the location of the earthquake M 4.1 on 1 Feb; red frame in the upper right corner of image shows magnitude, depth and date/time of the earthquake (image: HVO)
Seismic station of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a volcano-tectonic earthquake with magnitude M 4.1 located beneath the southern flank of the volcano at depth 6 km (4 miles) at about 14:09 local time yesterday. The earthquake was centered about 13 km (8 miles) south of Fern Forest, near the Hōlei Pali area of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park with weak to light shaking that has been reported across the Island of Hawai'i.
According to HVO scientist, David Phillips, the earthquake had no impact on the ongoing effusive eruption at Kīlauea's summit.
Residents should be aware that possible aftershocks may be felt.
Kīlauea's south flank has been the site of over 30 earthquakes of magnitude-4.0 or greater during the past 20 years. Most are caused by abrupt motion of the volcano's south flank, which moves to the southeast over the oceanic crust. The location, depth, and waveforms recorded as part of today's earthquake are consistent with motion along the south flank detachment fault.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 2 February 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): cracks divide active and inactive portions of lava lake

Mon, 1 Feb 2021, 11:23
11:23 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Cracks divide active and inactive portions of the growing Halema‘uma‘u lava lake (image: HVO)
Cracks divide active and inactive portions of the growing Halema‘uma‘u lava lake (image: HVO)
Western fissure emits the gas content and supplies the lava flow into the lava lake. Snow from a recent storm can be seen on the summit of Mauna Loa Volcano, in the upper left corner of the image (image: HVO)
Western fissure emits the gas content and supplies the lava flow into the lava lake. Snow from a recent storm can be seen on the summit of Mauna Loa Volcano, in the upper left corner of the image (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues and has remained essentially unchanged at moderate levels.
The western fissure continues to supply the lava into the growing Halema'uma'u lava lake.
According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) a north-south trending line of surficial cracks divides the boundary between the western active portion (left) and eastern stagnant portion (right) of the Halema'uma'u lava lake. Lake depth measurements from 28 January on both sides of the cracks (near center) indicate that the eastern portion of the lava lake is 4 m (13 ft) lower than the western portion of the lava lake. In contrast, the stagnant eastern portion is a duller gray with several smaller islands visible. North of the cracks (upper center), the top of the inactive northern vent spatter cone is nearly submerged by the rising lava lake.
On 23 January a sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions reached to a 2200 tonnes/day and continues at elevated levels including seismic activity.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 1 February 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): moderate earthquake in Kaʻū district

Fri, 15 Jan 2021, 07:43
07:43 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Distribution of the earthquakes (red frame) in Kaʻū district during the past month (image: HVO)
Distribution of the earthquakes (red frame) in Kaʻū district during the past month (image: HVO)
Seismic network of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) recorded a volcano-tectonic earthquake with magnitude M 4 located beneath the south part of the Island of Hawai'i, in the district of Kaʻū at about 18:15 local time yesterday.
The earthquake was located approx. 8 km northeast of Pāhala at depth 34 km (21 miles).
Moderate shaking with maximum intensity of V on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale, has been reported across parts of the Island of Hawai'i.
According to HVO scientist, David Phillips, the earthquake had no impact on the ongoing effusive eruption at Kīlauea's summit. "This earthquake is part of the ongoing seismic swarm under the Pāhala area, which started in August 2019. Unlike most events associated with this swarm, this earthquake was widely felt across the Island of Hawai'i, and as far away as Oʻahu."
Earthquakes beneath Kīlauea's lower Southwest Rift Zone occur mostly at depths of 25-40 km (15-25 miles), beneath the town of Pāhala and extending about 10 km (6 miles) offshore.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 15 January 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): resumption of lava fountaining

Wed, 13 Jan 2021, 07:49
07:49 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Lava fountains from western fissure vent at Kilauea volcano on 11 January (image: HVO)
Lava fountains from western fissure vent at Kilauea volcano on 11 January (image: HVO)
The active west fissure is visible at left, several floating islands within the lake remain active (image: HVO)
The active west fissure is visible at left, several floating islands within the lake remain active (image: HVO)
Spatter cone formed around the fountaining vent (image: HVO)
Spatter cone formed around the fountaining vent (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues characterized by continuous feeding the growing lava lake.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that over the past few days, the western fissure vent within Halema'uma'u has escalated from weak spattering to continuous fountaining supplying lava to an open channel that was pouring into the lava lake. A spatter cone has built around both the fountaining vent and its turbulent outflow channel down to the lava lake.
The current lava lake depth is about 196 m (643 ft) with the floating islands inside.
Gas emissions and seismicity remain elevated.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 13 January 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): floating islands in the lava lake

Mon, 11 Jan 2021, 07:48
07:48 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
The largest floating island in Halema‘uma‘u crater lake (image: HVO)
The largest floating island in Halema‘uma‘u crater lake (image: HVO)
Red arrows show the floating islands in the lava lake at Kilauea volcano (image: HVO)
Red arrows show the floating islands in the lava lake at Kilauea volcano (image: HVO)
The effusive eruption of the volcano continues. The west vent continues to feed the growing lava lake that remains active and hasn't shown big variations over the past days.
According to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), a few floating islands formed in the lava lake. The largest island is about 250 m (820 ft) long, 135 m (440 ft) wide and 20 m (65 ft) tall. On 1 January the islands'edges were about 6 m (20 ft) above the lava lake surface. On 4 Janury the whole island had risen by about 2 m (6-7 ft). The island has rotated and moved both eastward and westward since its formation on the first day of the eruption. On 6 January at about 22:30 local time the island stalled in rotation and movement.
Webcam imagery and eyewitness observations indicate that it formed through a combination of lava interacting with the lake water, early lava flows, and tephra erupted from the early highest fountains. Islands have been observed in Kīlauea lava lakes for more than 100 years. The apparent buoyancy changes of the island may be due to a density increase in the lava lake as gases escape or sloughing off of island material from the subsurface.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 11 January 2021

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): new eruption in summit caldera

Mon, 21 Dec 2020, 09:22
09:22 AM | AUTORE: T
Weak glow is visible from the Kilauea caldera this morning (evening in Hawaii) (image: HVO / USGS)
Weak glow is visible from the Kilauea caldera this morning (evening in Hawaii) (image: HVO / USGS)
Earthquakes at Kilauea during the past week (image: HVO)
Earthquakes at Kilauea during the past week (image: HVO)
Location of this morning's quake near Kalapana
Location of this morning's quake near Kalapana
A new eruption started at Kilauea volcano in the evening of 20 Dec in Hawaii (local time). The volcano observatory reported:
"Shortly after approximately 9:30 p.m. HST, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) detected glow within Halemaʻumaʻu crater at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano. An eruption has commenced within Kīlauea's summit caldera. The situation is rapidly evolving and HVO will issue another statement when more information is available."
During the past weeks, earthquakes had been more frequent under the caldera and the upper rift zone. They likely reflected magma intrusions at shallow level.
Shortly after the new eruption, observed less than two hours ago, a magnitude 4.3 quake struck the southern flank of the volcano, about 10 miles west of Kalapana. This quake might be related as a response to the new eruption, probably causing a small southwards movement of the southern flank of Kilauea, acting as adjustment for the additional space needed of the magma intrusion in the summit area.

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): increased seismic activity

Fri, 4 Dec 2020, 10:11
10:11 AM |
Northeastern flank of  Puʻu ʻŌʻō (image: HVO)
Northeastern flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō (image: HVO)
According to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) an increase of seismic activity has been recorded during 29 Nov-3 Dec.
On 29-30 November the seismic instruments recorded over 80 earthquakes located southwest of the volcano at depths 6.5 km that continued for 11 hours.
On 2 December the elevated seismic activity continued as the seismic station recorded over 220 earthquakes located at depths 1-4 km below the surface.
As of the afternoon on 3 December the seismic activity has decreased and returned to background levels.
These shallow earthquakes have not posed a hazard from ground-shaking. The largest event in the sequence was a magnitude-3 earthquake. This suggests that a new batch of magma is rising inside the volcano's conduits.
Kīlauea summit ground deformation rates accompanying the earthquake activity had a brief excursion from trends observed in the past several months.
On 2 December, the volcano summit tiltmeters experienced a transient episode of deformation, recording a notable tilt signal (10–14 microradians) within a few hours. Tiltmeters have since returned to measuring tilt rates similar to recent months.
Other monitoring data streams remained stable.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 4 December 2020

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): earthquake swarm near summit caldera

Fri, 23 Oct 2020, 16:18
16:18 PM | AUTORE: T
Location of today's quakes (red) near the summit of Kilauea volcano
Location of today's quakes (red) near the summit of Kilauea volcano
A swarm of small shallow earthquakes has been occurring today in an area 2-3 miles northwest of the summit caldera, near the Highway 11.
So far, almost 50 quakes of magnitudes between 1.7 and 3.0 have been recorded by USGS, at shallow depths mostly around 2-3 km.
Whether the quakes are related to magmatic processes or are purely tectonic in origin is unclear; USGS has not yet commented on the events. The largest tremor, a magnitude 3.0 quake 9 Km WSW at 1.43 am local time, was felt by some residents of Volcano village.

Hawaii’s Kīlauea Volcano – an exaggeration of the truth

Sat, 10 Oct 2020, 09:02
09:02 AM | AUTORE: ELEANOR
Panorama view of Halemaʻumaʻu water lake taken 09 October 2020 (Image: USGS live webcam)
Panorama view of Halemaʻumaʻu water lake taken 09 October 2020 (Image: USGS live webcam)
To capture the public's attention, some news articles occasionally over-exaggerate on the scientific truth, elaborating on evidence and observation. Is the Halema'uma'u Crater within Kīlauea Volcano really “turning into a deadly crater lake?” as portrayed in a recent Forbes article and thus triggering similar eye-catching news stories. One article claims “the volcano is quickly turning into a crater lake full of lava” - a statement that is very misleading and, scientifically, inaccurate for the volcano in question.

In 2018, Kīlauea's months-long eruption on the lower East Rift Zone caused devastation across Hawaii's Big Island and transformed the landscape forever as lava flows entered the Pacific Ocean. Enough lava was erupted to fill at least 320,000 Olympic-size swimming pools (Source: USGS) and over 700 homes were destroyed – it is currently ranked as the most dangerous volcano in the United States. The eruptive sequence drained the Halemaʻumaʻu lava lake and shallow magma reservoir, resulting in a summit collapse and formation of a crater more than 500m in depth.

In July 2019, a water lake appeared within the crater and has since been growing. The lake depth currently measures approximately 46 meters and the surface water temperature has maximum values of 80–85 degrees Celsius (176–185 degrees Fahrenheit) – likely a result of residual heat from the rubble at the base of Halema'uma'u. This rubble is from rock that was heated by the lava column prior to the 2018 collapse. The proximal vents (fumaroles) are also attributed to the intense surface temperatures measured. The cause of the water lake formation has been explained by USGS volcanologists as the rebounding of the water table following 2018 volcanic activity whereby the crater floor subsided more than 70 meters below the water table. It is important to stress that this lake is composed of water only, not a new lava lake as some articles are claiming. The orange/ rusty-brown appearance of the lake may give the illusion of lava to the untrained eye but this colouration is simply a result of chemical reactions taking place within the lake itself.

The presence of water within the crater potentially marks a transition in Kīlauea's eruptive style – although effusive volcanic activity is commonly attributed to this volcano, research by Swanson suggests over the past 2,500 years, Kīlauea has in fact erupted explosively approximately 60 percent of the time with an large explosive phreatomagmatic eruption in 1790 causing 400 fatalities. Although Kīlauea's eruptive style cycles between effusive and explosive are not entirely understood, volcanologists believe water originating from sources other than magma likely play a critical role. In this case, future eruptions at this volcano could see a sudden rise in magma through the conduit intersecting the newly formed lake or the crater floor could collapse, causing the lake water to be vaporised into steam therefore creating a phreatomagmatic eruption.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) will continue to extensively monitor this active volcano through methods such as tracking the lake temperature, seismic, gas, and ground deformation monitoring, and using drones to retrieve samples for laboratory analysis. Thermal monitoring is also used to provide new insights into what's happening in the restless zone below the lake.

Perhaps future news articles should concentrate less on exaggerating the potential deadly nature of this volcano and overlooking fundamental scientific background, but instead shift their focus to Kīlauea's crater lake as an opportunity to improve the scientific community's understanding of how such lakes evolve and interact with magmatic systems below and therefore, in the long term, how it can be used to benefit and adapt current monitoring and mitigation strategies.
---
Links / Sources:
  • Forbes article: Hawaii's Kīlauea Volcano Is Turning Into A Deadly Crater Lake (Mack, 2020)
  • Science News article by AGU : From Lava to Water: A New Era at Kīlauea (Nadeau, Diefenbach, Hurwitz, and Swanson, 2020)
  • HVO Kīlauea Volcano monthly update

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i) activity update: Eruptive hiatus continues, gas emissions at lowest levels since before 1983.

Wed, 3 Oct 2018, 21:43
21:43 PM | AUTORE: MJFLEGEND
Crusted cone and channel of Fissure 8, primary vent of recent eruption. Steaming caused by rainfall. Credit: USGS.
Crusted cone and channel of Fissure 8, primary vent of recent eruption. Steaming caused by rainfall. Credit: USGS.
Activity at Kilauea remains at very low levels, with no eruptions anywhere on the volcano, as has been the case since early September.

Seismicity and deformation are at background levels, and interestingly, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that total gas emissions across the volcano are at their lowest levels since before the start of the long-term Pu'u O'o eruption in 1983.

It remains uncertain whether the eruption has completely ended or just temporarily paused. The Aviation Color Code and Alert Level remain at ORANGE/WATCH.
---
Links / Sources:
  • HVO: Activity reports from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): summit water lake continues to rise

Fri, 7 Aug 2020, 09:23
09:23 AM | AUTORE: MARTIN
Comparison of Kilauea's summit (water) lake between 2 August 2019 and 21 July 2020 (image: HVO)
Comparison of Kilauea's summit (water) lake between 2 August 2019 and 21 July 2020 (image: HVO)
Summi  lake at Kilauea volcano on 28 July 2020 with greenish zones (image: HVO)
Summi lake at Kilauea volcano on 28 July 2020 with greenish zones (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the lake at the summit of Kīlauea taken on 31 July (image: HVO)
Thermal image of the lake at the summit of Kīlauea taken on 31 July (image: HVO)
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) reported that the volcano's summit water lake has continued to rise since 25 July last year when water was first spotted at the bottom of Halema'uma'u pit crater inside the summit caldera.
Over the past year, the summit water lake has grown to more than 270 m (885 ft) long and 131 m (430 ft) wide, covering a surface area over 2.5 hectares (6 acres). The lake is over 40 m (130 ft) deep and contains a volume of approximately 480,000 cubic meters.
On 2 August 2019, only a small green pond approx. 6 ft (2 m) deep could be seen.
The image taken on 21 July 2020 shows a lake more than 130 ft (40 m) deep with shades of tan to brown and a sharp color boundary often cutting across the lake.
The photo taken on 28 July 2020 shows vibrant lake colors with a zone of aquamarine water in the west end. These greenish zones tend to be slightly hotter and appear to be zones of water influx.
The maximum temperatures on the lake surface at this time were measured at about 82 degrees Celsius (180 degrees Fahrenheit).
Surface water at the summit presents a potential future hazard at the summit: Magma interacting with near-surface water can, in some circumstances, trigger violent steam-blast explosions.
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory volcano activity update 7 August 2020

Kilauea volcano (Hawai'i): summit crater lake continues to grow slowly

Sat, 4 Apr 2020, 00:51
00:51 AM | AUTORE: MATTHEW
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have released the monthly update of activity at Kilauea volcano over the month of March.
There were variable rates of seismicity over March, however, the rates were within a range that has been observed over the past year. Sulfur dioxide emission rates at the summit are low and are below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone. As of March 19th, the dimensions of the water pond at the bottom of Halema'uma'u are approximately 107 meters (~351 feet) by 211 meters (~692 feet). This is a growth of 7 meters (22 feet) by 11 meters (36 feet) since the last update (March 6th) As of April 1st, the current depth is approximately 32 meters (105 feet). The pond has therefore deepened by 4 meters (13 feet)

Over the past month, the summit tiltmeter recorded 10 deflation-inflation events, a number similar to January and February. Since March 2019, GPS stations and tiltmeters at the Kilauea summit have recorded deformation which HVO state is consistent with slow magma accumulation within the shallow portion of the Kilauea summit magma system (1-2 km or approximately 1 mile below ground level). There is continued low levels of sulfur dioxide emissions from the Halema'uma'u area, consistent with no significant shallowing of magma. HVO note that some of the sulfur dioxide is being dissolved into the summit lake.

Along the East Rift Zone, HVO GPS stations and tiltmeters continue to show motions consistent with slowed refilling of the deep East Rift Zone magmatic reservoir in the broad region between Puʻu ʻŌʻō and Highway 130. GPS station JOKA, and tilt station JKA, in the lower East Rift Zone, experienced an episode of deformation from March 14-26th with a different direction from the longer term trend. Data retrieved manually in the next few weeks may provide more insight. The south flank of Kilauea continues to creep seaward at elevated rates following the May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake near Kalapana.

“Although not currently erupting, areas of persistently elevated ground temperatures and minor release of gases are still found in the vicinity of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone fissures. These include steam (water), very small amounts of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide. These conditions are expected to be long-term. Similar conditions following the 1955 eruption continued for years to decades.”

“Hazards: Hazards remain in the lower East Rift Zone eruption area and at the Kilauea summit. Residents and visitors near the 2018 fissures, lava flows, and summit collapse area should heed Hawaii County Civil Defense and National Park warnings. Lava flows and features created by the 2018 eruption are primarily on private property and persons are asked to be respectful and not enter or park on private property.”
---
Links / Sources:
  • https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/updates.html#calvo
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Dr. Tom Pfeiffer, volcanologist, volcano photographer, tour organizer member of
IAVCEI
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Ecotourism Greece
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