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Kunlun volcano

pyroclastic cones 5808 m / 19,055 ft
Tibet, China, 35.52°N / 80.2°E
Current status: dormant (1 out of 5) | Reports
Kunlun volcano books
Typical eruption style: strombolian
Kunlun volcano eruptions: 1951, uncertain reports about an eruption in the 19th century No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Kunlun volcano is a group of about 70 fresh-looking cinder cones in NW Tibet. Although the cones are not very large, thanks to its location in the Tibetan Plateau, Kunlun is the highest volcano in the northern hemisphere.
An eruption occurred 1951 at Ashi Shan cone, marking the latest volcanic activity in China.

Background:

The Kunlun volcano group comprises the trachyandesitic Ashikule volcano group at the western end of the Kunlun Mountains. At least 10 of the cones are Pliocene-to-Holocene age, including the Ashi Shan volcano, the youngest in China, which erupted in 1951.
This and several other young cones lie in the area around Ashi (Aqqikkol) and Wuluke (Ulugkol) lakes.

1951 eruption
China's most recent volcanic eruption occurred on 27 May 1951 from the Ashi Shan (also known as Ka-er-daxi or Vulkan) cinder cone, part of the Kunlun volcanic group in NW Tibet.
The eruption began with a loud detonation and ejected large blocks, emitting "smoke" for a number of days.

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