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News from Marsili volcano

Tuesday, Feb 25, 2014
A recently published study shows that submarine explosive eruptions have occurred at the underwater volcano in historical times. Therefore, the volcano should be included as one of Italy's still active volcanoes. [more]
 

Marsili Seamount volcano

submarine volcano −450 m / −1,476 ft
Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy, 39.25°N / 14.39°E
Current status: normal or dormant (1 out of 5) | Reports
Marsili Seamount volcano books
Last update: 26 Mar 2019
Typical eruption style: submarine-explosive
Marsili Seamount volcano eruptions: approx. 5000 years ago Location map of Marsili Seamount (from Nicolosi et al, 2006)No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Marsili is a large, active submarine volcano in the southeastern central Tyrrhenian Sea, located about 175 kilometers (109 mi) south of Naples. It rises about 3,000 m (9,800 feet) from the sea floor and its peak and crater reach within 450 m (1400 ft) beneath the water surface.
A recent study has shown that submarine, explosive eruptions occurred at Marsili in historical times. The volcano has the potential (an is likely) to erupt again in the future. The main hazard from the volcano is tsunami generation if a larger collapse of the unstable volcanic edifice occurs during or after an eruption.

Background:

References:
- Gianluca Iezzi, Carlo Caso, Guido Ventura, Mattia Vallefuoco, Andrea Cavallo, Harald Behrens, Silvio Mollo, Diego Paltrinieri, Patrizio Signanini, Francesco Vetere (2014) "First documented deep submarine explosive eruptions at the Marsili Seamount (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): A case of historical volcanism in the Mediterranean Sea", Gondwana Research, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 764–774
- Caratori Tontini F., Cocchi L., Muccini F., Carmisciano C., Marani M., Bonatti E., Ligi M., and Boschi E. (2010) "Potential-field modelling of collapse-prone submarine volcanoes in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)", Geophysical Research Letter 37, Volume 37, Issue 3
- Iacopo Nicolosi, Fabio Speranza, Massimo Chiappini (2006) "Ultrafast oceanic spreading of the Marsili Basin, southern Tyrrhenian Sea: Evidence from magnetic anomaly analysis", Geology, v. 34, p. 717-720


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