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Topics: Volcanology glossary | Earthquake glossary

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Yake-dake (Volcano)

Yake-dake volcano is a small dominantly andesitic stratovolcano near the popular resort of Kamikochi in the Northern Japan Alps. It is one of several Japanese volcanoes named Yake-dake or Yake-yama ("Burning Peak" or "Burning Mountain"). It has had frequent small to moderate phreatic eruptions in the 20th century. A small hydrothermal explosion in a hydrothermal area killed 2 persons on 11 Feb 1995 at a highway construction site. -> See whole entry

Yanteles (Volcano)

Yanteles is a little-studied stratovolcanoin southern Chile. It has 5 glacier-capped peaks. It was reported to have erupted in 1835 one day after a magnitude 8.1 earthquake 800 km away, but the eruption is not confirmed. -> See whole entry

Yasur (Volcano)

Yasur is the most well known volcanoes of Vanuatu and one of the most active volcanoes in the world. Yasur is known for its spectacular persistent strombolian activity that consists of regular small to violent explosions from one or several vents. -> See whole entry

Yate (Volcano)

Yate volcano is an isolated and poorly known young stratovolcano in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone on the Hualaihué peninsula, Chile, south of the Relancaví strait and NNE of Volcán Hornopirén. The volcano is glacially dissected and consists of basaltic-andesite lava flows and domes from the summit and flank vents. It contains 6 eruptive centers along a 7.5 km long fissure. Yate has experienced multiple summit collapses NE and SW of the summit. It sits on the Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone which extends for over 1,000 km along the volcanic arc of southern Chile. There are no records of historical volcanic activity at Yate volcano, but there is stratigraphic evidence of small eruptions in the Holocene, the most recent being forming basaltic-andesite cinder cones on the NW and western flanks. Source: Smithsonian / GVP volcano information

Yelia (Volcano)

Mt Yelia volcano was first recognized as a volcano in 1963, although it has long been a familiar landmark for pilots flying between Port Moresby and Goroka. The last significant eruption of Yelia volcano was about 18,000 years ago, and it is unknown whether it has erupted since then. There is weak solfataric activity in the summit crater and there are unverified reports from local inhabitants of an eruption during the early 1940's. -> See whole entry

Yellowstone (Volcano)

Yellowstone is one of the largest known volcanoes in the world and the largest volcanic system in North America. The volcano is found above an intra-plate hot spot that has been feeding the magma chamber underneath Yellowstone for at least 2 million years. The giant caldera is the product of large-scale collapse of the crust after 3 so-called ultra-Plinian or super-volcano eruptions - large explosive events that erupt several hundreds to few thousands of cubic km of magma. These eruptions took place 2.1, 1.3 and 0.64 million years ago. Yellowstone is also the world's largest hydrothermal system. It contains 182 geysers, mud pools and fumaroles. The most famous feature in Yellowstone is Old Faithful Geyser. Future super-volcano eruptions at Yellowstone? Yellowstone's magma chamber is believed to be still active and contain at least 15,000 cubic km of melt. It cannot be ruled out, nor predicted that there will be another super-volcano eruption at Yellowstone in some (geologic) future. In recent years, the caldera has been studied and is being monitored more closely. In recent years, Yellowstone has been showing unrest in the form of deformation, ground uplift, temperature changes, and seismic swarms, all of which have been followed with great interest and rising some concern. 70 small earthquake swarms were recorded at Yellowstone volcano between 1983 and 2006. On the other hand, such activity is probably entirely normal for a large dormant super-volcano. Despite the unrest, there is currently no reason to believe that these are precursors to another large super-volcano eruption to happen in the nearer future (years to decades). More likely, these are normal activities in dormant stages of large active volcanic systems. In addition, most of the activity can be related to the hydrothermal system rather than the magma chamber itself. Statistically, even though the interval of time lapsed since the last such eruption is similar to the intervals separating the past 3 eruptions, statistical likelihood that such an event will repeat itself in the next few 100 years is very low. Unfortunately, most media reports in recent years have been exaggerating this risk greatly. -> See whole entry

Yojoa (Volcano)

Yojoa volcano is a volcanic field at the northern end of Lake Yojoa, in southern Honduras. The volcanic field consists of Pleistocene-to-Holocene scoria cones, pit craters and lava flows, the longest of which extends north to the village of Río Lindo. -> See whole entry

Yokoate-jima (Volcano)

Yokoate-jima volcano forms the small, 3.5-km-long island with the same name and is located NW of Amami Oshima Island at the SW end of the Tokara island chain. The only known historic eruption was in the first half of the 19th century. -> See whole entry

Yomba (Volcano)

An unknown submarine volcano is included in the Global Volcanism's catalogue as active: Local legends tell that a volcano located in the position of Hankow Reef erupted 9-11 generations ago and then sunk.The story is found in oral traditions of many villages along the Madang coast. The legend also tells that the island was destroyed by an eruption accompanied by a tsunami. The Hankow Reef, located between Bagabag and Crown Islands, NW of Long Island, is the most likely candidate for the unknown volcano.

Yotei (Volcano)

Yotei volcano (羊蹄山 Yōteizan) is a symmetrical andesitic-to-dacitic stratovolcano NW of Usu volcano on southern Hokkaido, Japan. The summit contains a 700 m wide crater and its flanks are cut by deep erosion gullies. The last eruption of the summit crater was about 5-6000 years ago. Hangetsu-ko (Half Moon Lake) is a tuff cone on the lower NW flank of Yotei. It erupted ca 3000 years ago.

Yucamane (Volcano)

Yucamane is an active andesitic stratovolcano in southern Perú at the southern end of a group of 3 volcanoes (including Tutupaca and Cerro Caliente volcanoes to the north). Eruptions at the volcano have produced lava flows, airfall deposits, pyroclastic flows and surges (mainly block-and-ash flows produced by lava dome collapse). -> See whole entry

 

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