Check out our destinations and tours!
Follow us:
FacebookTwitterGoogle PlusYouTube
News

no news in this list.

Carrizozo volcano

cinder cones 1731 m / 5,679 ft
New Mexico, USA (mainland exept Alaska), 33.78°N / -105.93°W
Current status: dormant (1 out of 5)
Typical eruption style: effusive
Carrizozo volcano eruptions: 3250 BC ± 500 years No recent earthquakes
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
The massive Carrizozo lava flow is one of Earth's longest known lava flows that were erupted in the past 10,000 years. The basalt flow is 50 m thick, 75 km long, 1-5 km wide and was mainly fed by lava tubes.

Background:

The vent of the Carrizozo lava flow is a broad low basaltic shield on the floor of the Tularosa Basin, east of the Rio Grande Rift, topped by Little Black Peak, a small cinder cone with 3 nested craters and a frozen lava lake.
The flow reached a length of 75 km extending into the Tularosa Basin of south-central New Mexico. Its total volume is estimated 4.3 cubic km.
It is similar to the presently active lava flow field of Kilauea volcano on Hawai'i, and believed to have been produced by a persistent single eruption that might have lasted a few decades.
A surface exposure age of about 5200 years Before Present was obtained for the Carrizozo lava flow, the second youngest in New Mexico. An older lava flow traveled 16 km south and 11 km east from Broken Back crater.
---
Source: GVP Carrizozo volcano information


More on VolcanoDiscovery:

Comments:

Copyrights: VolcanoDiscovery.
Use of material: Text and images on this webpage are copyrighted. Further reproduction and use without authorization is not consented. If you need licensing rights for photographs, for example for publications and commercial use, please contact us.