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Ash emissions from Chaparrastique volcano yesterday (MARN)
Monday, Jul 14, 2014
Chaparrastique volcano has started to produce small explosions and significant ash emissions. An increase of the ongoing eruption could occur any time and is expected to occur either from the summit vent or from the northern flank (because earthquakes have been clustered under this part of the volcano during the past months). ... [more]
Tremor amplitude at Chaparrastique volcano over the past weeks (MARN)
Wednesday, Jul 02, 2014
Ash emissions have occurred increasingly at Chaparrastique volcano and tremor has risen again sharply to its highest level ever. Volcanologists from MARN in El Salvador are on high alert of a possible impending stronger eruption. [more]

San Miguel volcano

stratovolcano 2130 m / 6,988 ft
El Salvador, 13.43°N / -88.27°W
Current status: erupting (4 out of 5)
San Miguel webcams / live data
Last update: 14 Jul 2014 (ash emissions, small explosions, increasing tremor)
Typical eruption style: small to moderate phreatic and phreatomagmatic summit explosions
San Miguel volcano eruptions: 2002, 1997, 1995, 1985-86, 1976-77, 1970, 1967, 1966 (Jul), 1966 (Feb), 1964, 1954, 1939, 1936(?), 1931, 1930, 1929, 1919-20, 1890-91, 1884, 1882, 1867-68, 1862, 1857, 1855, 1854(?), 1844-48, 1819, 1811(?), 1798(?), 1787, 1769, 1762, 1699, 1510 ± 5 years
Last earthquakes nearby:
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Sat, 31 May
Sat, 31 May 15:20 UTCM 3.0 / 2.1 km10 km Nicaragua
San Miguel volcano (also known locally as Chaparrastique) in eastern El Salvador is a symmetrical stratovolcano and one of the most active volcanoes of the country. It rises majestically from near sea level to 2130 m elevation and forms a prominent land mark.
The volcano's summit lacks vegetation due to frequent eruptions, but its flanks are largely covered with coffee plantations.
San Miguel has a broad, deep crater complex, which has frequently changed morphology during historic eruptions recorded since the early 16th century.

Background:

Radial fissures on the flanks of the basaltic-andesitic San Miguel volcano have fed a series of historical lava flows, including several erupted during the 17th-19th centuries that reached beyond the base of the volcano on the north, NE, and SE sides.
The SE-flank lava flows are the largest and form broad, sparsely vegetated lava fields crossed by highways and a railroad skirting the base of the volcano.
The location of flank vents has migrated higher on the edifice during historical time, and the most recent activity has consisted of minor ash eruptions from the summit crater.
(Source: GVP)

San Miguel Photos:



2002-2006 unrest and seismic activity
Following the small eruption in January 2002, San Miguel volcano remained restless for over 4 years, with periods of increased seismic activity, landslides inside the crater, increased fumarole activity, and lahars triggered by heavy rains. The volcano was on alert several times, but no eruption occurred in this period. ...more

2002 eruption
On 16 January, gas and steam emissions with some ash were observed at San Miguel, reaching a few 100 meters above the summit crater

2000-2001 lahars
A large lahar occurred on 26 August 2000 and damaged houses and a highway north of the volcano. On 6 September 2001, another lahar damaged a highway.

1997 eruption
A small eruption occurred on 31 December 1997 and produced minor ashfall.

1995 eruption
A small eruption occurred on 23 March 1995. ...more

1976-77 eruption
After 6 years of dormancy, San Miguel started erupting on 2 December 1976. The eruption built a new spatter cone in the central crater and continued until 12 December. It paused for 56 days and resumed on 28 February the following year and ended on 1 March.

1970 eruption
An eruption of San Miguel volcano started on 30 March 1970 and lasted until 4 April. It consisted of small ash emissions, sometimes accompanied by loud explosions.
The first ash eruption could be heard 4 km away and produced an ash plume rising 400 m above the crater. Light ashfall occurred at up to 10 km distance.

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