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Small eruption at Tungurahua this morning (IGEPN webcam)
Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014
The volcano's activity remains moderate with frequent small to medium sized strombolian- to vulcanian-type explosions. ... [more]
Strombolian activity at Tungurahua yesterday morning (IGEPN)
Monday, Aug 04, 2014
Activity continued to increase at the volcano as new magma continues to arrive at its summit. Since the first ash emission a week ago, more and stronger explosions, as well as phases of continuous ash and gas emissions and milder strombolian activity have occurred. ... [more]

Tungurahua volcano

Stratovolcano 5023 m (16,479 ft)
Ecuador, -1.47°S / -78.44°W
Current status: erupting (4 out of 5)
Tungurahua webcams / live data
Tungurahua volcano videos
Last update: 19 Aug 2014 (moderate to strong strombolian explosions from central crater)
Typical eruption style: Explosive.
Tungurahua volcano eruptions: 1534, 1557, 1640(?), 1641, 1644(?), 1646(?), 1757(?), 1773, 1776, 1777(?), 1781(?), 1857, 1885(?), 1886-88, 1900(?), 1916-25, 1944, 2000-14
TimeMag. / DepthDistanceLocation
Thu, 13 Dec
Thu, 13 Dec 11:50 UTCM 3.1 / 3.3 km40 km Ecuador
Mon, 5 Nov
Mon, 5 Nov 19:42 UTCM 3.0 / 12.2 km39 km Ecuador
Sat, 3 Nov
Sat, 3 Nov 14:06 UTCM 3.6 / 12.3 km20 km Ecuador
Tungurahua is one of South America's most active volcanoes. Since 2000, a new lava dome has been growing in its summit crater. Tungurahua's activity has been characterized by frequent powerful ash explosions, producing ash plumes of several kilometers height as well as dangerous pyroclastic flows. Part of the population around its base has been evacuated.

Background:

The steep-sided andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano towers more than 3 km above its northern base and consists of three major volcanic edifices sequentially constructed since about 100,000 years ago over a basement of metamorphic rocks.
Tungurahua II was built within the past 14,000 years following the collapse of the initial edifice. Tungurahua II itself collapsed about 3000 years ago and produced a large debris-avalanche deposit and a horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the west, inside which the modern glacier-capped stratovolcano (Tungurahua III) was constructed.

Historical eruptions have all originated from the summit crater. They have been accompanied by strong explosions and sometimes by pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached populated areas at the volcano's base. Prior to a long-term eruption beginning in 1995 that caused the temporary evacuation of the city of Baños at the foot of the volcano, the last major eruption had occurred from 1916 to 1918, although minor activity continued until 1925.

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