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Volcano News from Iceland:

The southern end of the rampart; surveillance flight with the Icelandic Coast Guard 21 January 2015. Various measurements were made and the results will be published shortly. Photo: Morten S. Riishuus.(IMO)
Friday, Jan 23, 2015
No significant changes in seismic and volcanic activity have occurred recently at the ongoing Holuhraun eruption, but overall, a slowly decreasing trend of the activity is becoming evident. Still, magma effusion remains quite impressive, especially the large lava lake inside Baugur crater on the main part of the fissure. ... [more]
Observed caldera subsidence versus time - if the modeled curve is correct, it should flatten out in March this year and might mean the end of the eruption (source: visir.is)
Monday, Jan 19, 2015
According to Icelandic volcanologist Haraldur Sigurðsson, it is reasonable to predict that the eruption might be ending in March this year. ... [more]

Iceland and its volcanoes:

Iceland has the land area of Virginia and the population of Virginia Beach (about 260,000 people). The country has the highest literacy rate (100%) of any nation in the world. Its history has always been closely related to volcanoes and knowledge of many volcanic eruptions since the middle ages are preserved in accounts.
First settled by Vikings in the 9th century AD, Iceland established its own parliament in 930 and recorded its first historical volcanic eruption only a few years later. After a golden age of literature in the 12th and 13th centuries (when the sagas were written), natural history reporting reached a low around the 15th century. In the years 1707-09 a third of the population died from smallpox, and the 1783-84 Laki eruption killed a fifth of the remaining population by famine. Iceland gained sovereignty from Denmark in 1918 and complete independence in 1944.
Iceland is noted for subglacial and regional fissure eruptions related to the rifting process between the separating plates.
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(adapted from GVP/Smithsonian Institution)

Volcanoes of Iceland

Iceland, the land of ice and fire, is a true paradise for volcanologists. In few places on earth, geology and human history are so closely connected to volcanism as on Iceland. The island owns its existence to a large volcanic hot spot sitting on a mid-oceanic ridge, a unique setting. The plate boundary between the American and Eurasian tectonic plates crosses Iceland from south to North and the spreading process can be directly measured and observed on land.

Location of Iceland and the North Atlantic mid-ocean ridge where the American and Eurasian plates separate
Location of Iceland and the North Atlantic mid-ocean ridge where the American and Eurasian plates separate
Simplified map of Iceland showing its active volcanoes
Simplified map of Iceland showing its active volcanoes

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