Mt Fuji volcano

stratovolcano 3776 m / 12,388
Honshu, Japan, 35.36°N / 138.73°E
Current status: normal or dormant (1 out of 5)
Last update: 29 Oct 2018
"Ryu sho ten" or "Ryu shoten" (Dragon rising to the heavens), also known as "Gekko Zuihitsu" (Gekko's Sketch), a Ukiyo-e print from Ogata Gekko's Views of Mt. Fuji. A dragon rises out of smoke near Mt. Fuji, ascending towards the sky.
"Ryu sho ten" or "Ryu shoten" (Dragon rising to the heavens), also known as "Gekko Zuihitsu" (Gekko's Sketch), a Ukiyo-e print from Ogata Gekko's Views of Mt. Fuji. A dragon rises out of smoke near Mt. Fuji, ascending towards the sky.

Mount Fuji (Fuji-san, 富士山 in Japanese) is the highest volcano and highest peak in Japan and considered one of the 3 Holy Mountains (along with Mount Tate and Mount Haku). Fuji is a perfect, beautiful stratovolcano about 60 miles south-west of Tokyo, with an exceptionally symmetrical shape making it into famous symbol of Japan and an important element in Japanese art. It is a popular destination for excursions. More than 200,000 people climb to the top of the Mt Fuji every year. The last eruption of Mt Fuji was in 1707–08. Between 2000 and 2001, seismic activity under the volcano was at slightly elevated levels, rising concern about a possible reawakening of the volcano.

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Typical eruption style: Explosive
Mt Fuji volcano eruptions: 1707-08, 1700, 1627(?), 1560, 1511, 1427(?), 1083, 1032, 1017(?), 999(?), 993(?), 952(?), 937(?), 932, 870, 864-65, 830, 826, 802, 800, 781

Latest nearby earthquakes

TimeMag. / DepthDistance/Location
Sat, 19 Jun 2021 (GMT) (1 earthquake)
Jun 20, 2021 02:20:55.94 (19 Jun 2021 17:20:55 GMT)
3.4

12 km
23 km (14 mi)
Yamanashi, 10.4 km north of Gotenba, Shizuoka, Japan
Wed, 16 Jun 2021 (GMT) (1 earthquake)
Jun 17, 2021 01:41:16.59 (16 Jun 2021 16:41:16 GMT)
3.6

17 km
31 km (19 mi)
Minamitsuru-gun, Yamanashi, 26 km northwest of Hadano, Kanagawa, Japan
Mon, 14 Jun 2021 (GMT) (1 earthquake)
Jun 14, 2021 20:44:41.20 (14 Jun 2021 11:44:41 GMT)
2.6

215 km
43 km (27 mi)
Philippines Sea, 21 km southwest of Numazu, Shizuoka, Japan
Fri, 11 Jun 2021 (GMT) (1 earthquake)
Jun 11, 2021 10:36:48.04 (11 Jun 2021 01:36:48 GMT)
2.5

153 km
41 km (25 mi)
8 km northwest of Ōtsuki, Yamanashi, Japan

Background

Mt Fuji has a complex geologic origin. The large stratovolcano has a base diameter of almost 50 km and culminates in a 500 m wide and 250 m deep summit crater. The volcano overlies several older volcanoes, whose remnants form irregularities on Fuji's symmetrical profile, including Komitake and Ko-Fuji (Older Fuji) which was active 100,000 - 10,000 years ago.
The present-day, mainly basaltic edifice started to grow about 11-8,000 years ago when large lava flows were erupted that still form 25% of the volume of the edifice today.
From 8000 to 4500 years ago, Fuji's activity was mainly explosive before another effusive cycle took place between 4500 to 3000 years ago. In the past 3000 years, large explosive eruptions occurred in between phases of milder effusive activity. From 3000 to 2000 years ago, most eruptions took place at the summit, while a large number of flank eruptions occurred during the past 2000 years, forming more than 100 flank cones.
The last confirmed eruption of Mt Fuji took place in 1707 and was Fuji's largest during historical time. It deposited ash as far as present-day Tokyo and formed a large new crater on the east flank.
(Source: USGS / GVP)

Mt Fuji Photos

 


1707 eruption of Mt Fuji
On 26th October 1707, a new eruption announced itself with a large 8.4 magnitude earthquake devastating Honshu island, followed by several smaller earthquakes felt near Mt Fuji.
The eruption started on 16th December 1707 from a new vent on the SE flank of the volcano erupting a sub-plinian column of ash and pumice, turning into basaltic lava fountaining after 6 hours into the eruption. On the first day of the eruption, 72 houses and 3 Buddhist temples were destroyed in Subassiri town 10 km from the volcano.
Ash fell all over the south Kanto plain, Tokyo, and on areas of the NW Pacific ocean 280 km from the volcano. The total volume erupted over 16 days was estimated to 0.68 cubic km of magma.
Violent explosions were recorded until 25-27 December, before the eruption calmed down and ended on 1st January 1708.

See also: Sentinel hub | Landsat 8
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